Climate change

Elsevier,

Science Bulletin, Volume 61, Issue 23, December 2016, Pages 1833-1838

Future climate change is usually projected by coupled earth system models under specific emission scenarios designed by integrated assessment models (IAMs): this offline approach means there is no interaction between the coupled earth system models and the IAMs. This paper introduces a new method to design possible future emission scenarios and corresponding climate change, in which a simple economic and climate damage component is added to the coupled earth system model of Beijing Normal University (BNU-ESMs. Measuring future climate change is critical for reporting on progress on SDG 13 Climate action.
Low carbon investments in urban areas offer additional benefits (health and jobs). This article examines the co-benefits of low carbon investments in three 3 projects in different cities, addressing SDG 11 (sustainable cities and communities) and SDG 13 (climate action).
100% in 139 countries
For the world to reverse global warming, eliminate millions of annual air-pollution deaths, and provide secure energy, every country must have an energy roadmap based on widely available, reliable, zero-emission energy technologies. In support of SDG 7, this study presents such roadmaps for 139 countries of the world. These roadmaps are far more aggressive than what the Paris agreement calls for, but are still technically and economically feasible.
Researchers from George Washington University report on a low energy process that can capture and convert CO2 emissions into a material that is both useful and valuable: carbon nanotube wool. The research relates to the SDGs 12 responsible consumption and 13 climate action.
Elsevier,

Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 76, September 2017, Pages 1122-1133.

This article furthers goal 7 by critically reviewing the 24 most credible studies claiming to show that a 100% renewable electricity system is achievable. The paper concludes that these studies have substantially underestimated the challenge and delayed the identification and implementation of effective and comprehensive decarbonization pathways.
Bangladesh is one of the world's most vulnerable countries to climate change. This study combines environmental and human elements to assess socio-environmental outcomes. It examines the implications of climate change on poor communities dependent on fishing for their livelihoods, exploring the interconnectedness of SDG's 1,2, 14 and how they will be impacted by SDG 13.
This study makes important links between SDG 2, SDG 5 and SDG 13 through its examination of how husbands and wives within the same household perceive climate risks and use group-based approaches as coping strategies. The findings indicate that options for adapting to climate change closely interplay with husbands' and wives' roles and responsibilities, social norms, risk perceptions and access to resources. A higher percentage of wives were found to adopt crop-related strategies, whereas husbands employ livestock- and agroforestry-related strategies.
Elsevier,

World Development, Volume 96, August 2017, Pages 359-374

This article reviews the evidence and outcomes of Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) Schemes in achieving environmental objectives and socio-economic co-benefits in varying contexts. These schemes, which offer incentives to land users to protect or enhance environmental or ecological services, are subject to refreshed analysis in this article. SDG 15 targets A and B are specifically concerned with financial incentives for environmental protection and conservation.
Climate services for health is an emerging discipline aiming to help health professionals better understand the effect of climate and weather conditions on health, and ultimately, to anticipate disease risk consequent upon climate change. This article shows the connections of goal 3 (good health and wellbeing) and goal 13 (climate action) in its application of climate services for health to dengue fever.
Elsevier,

Journal of Cleaner Production, Volume 155, Part 1, 2017, Pages 105-118, ISSN 0959-6526,

Climate change, population growth and rapidly increasing urbanisation severely threaten water quantity and quality in Sub-Saharan Africa. Treating wastewater is necessary to preserve the water bodies; reusing treated wastewater appears a viable option that could help to address future water challenges. In areas already suffering energy poverty, the main barrier to wastewater treatment is the high electricity demand of most facilities. This work aims to assess the benefits of integrating renewable energy technologies to satisfy the energy needs of a wastewater treatment facility based on a conventional activated sludge system, and also considers the case of including a membrane bioreactor so treated wastewater can be reused for irrigation.

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