Climate change

This study describes a natural experiment on attitudes about a critical social issue, global warming, showing how political ideology moderates views on climate change: SDG 13. In the process, it provides convincing evidence about an important question concerning cognition: how we form beliefs.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 28, 2017, Pages 450-452

This paper discusses the CO2 footprint of California’s drought during 2012–2014. The authors show that California drought significantly increased CO2 emissions of the energy sector by around 22 million metric tons, indicating 33% increase in the annual CO2 emissions compared to pre-drought conditions. They argue that CO2 emission of climate extremes deserve more attention, because their cumulative impacts on CO2 emissions are staggering. Most countries, including the United States, do not have a comprehensive a nationwide energy-water plan to minimize their CO2 emissions, therefore the authors argue that developing a national water-energy plan under a changing climate should be prioritized in the coming years.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society,Volume 27,2016,Pages 439-447,ISSN 2210-6707

The study of resilience in the face of large physical and climatic change has emerged as an important area of research. But while the physical variables under study are easily identified, the notion of resilience itself remains nebulous. This poses a special challenge to water security in cities. The tensions are resolved when resilience is conceived of as a teleological concept that relates to the desired futures of the community.This study shows an empirical way to achieve this by using narrative analysis on the case of water security. Such a teleological concept can be used to resolve tensions pointed out earlier and give practical insights, related to SDG 6 and 11.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 398-406

Water harvesting is an ancient practice that has been used, mainly in dry environments, to increase efficiency of water collection and use by directing water from a large natural watershed or man-made collection surface into a small basin where the water can be stored in underground reservoirs or to be used directly for irrigation or domestic uses. In modern era water harvesting has been neglected, particularly at the developed countries, due to the technological achievements in the fields of water production and transport. This relates to SDG 6 and SDG 11.
Elsevier,

Futures, Available online 19 October 2016

Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) is vital for advancing the SDGs. This paper looks at transformative learning that prepares students for societal change. The discussion is grounded both in theories about hope from disparate scientific disciplines and in empirical research about young people’s hope concerning global climate change. These insights particularly inform SDG 4.7 to ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, as well as SDGs 3, 11 and 13.
ICIS,

ICIS EPCA Supplement 2015, pages 56-57, 26 September 2016

Future progress on managing climate change is in our hands
Landmark emissions targets were outlined at the COP21 meeting in Paris in 2015 and the chemical industry will play an important role in achieving them. The support of the chemical industry is vital for advancing SDG 13.2 to integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning. This report also emphasises the opportunities that climate action brings to the chemical industry.
A farmer in Uganda
Lucy Ajok, a 34 year old Ugandan farmer, gives Farmers Weekly an insight into her rural life. Lucy is a single mother of five children and lives on a three-acre farm practising mixed farming. Farming families dependent on family labour, like Lucy's, are typically the poorest in Uganda, and often have the additional challenge of HIV. This interview shares some of the challenges faced in achieving SDG 1 and SDG 2.
The role of agriculture in flood risk mitigation has been largely overlooked in the UK government’s national flood resilience review. Farm leaders are concerned that the review contains little mention of agriculture, rural communities or food security. This highlights the need to address flood risk mitigation holistically to support SDG 13.1 to strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters, and SDG 2.4 to implement resilient agricultural practices that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, including flooding.
One of the most important consequences of climate change could be its effects on agriculture and subsequent global food availability. This modelling study is the first quantitative analysis of the global health implications of dietary and weight changes in view of climate change and agricultural production. It estimates the excess mortality attributable to agriculturally mediated changes by cause of death for 155 world regions in the year 2050. Authors warn that climate change mitigation will be key to preventing climate-related deaths through food insecurity and thereby demonstrating the linkages between SDG 3 and SDG 13.
Studies of waste-to-energy systems have applied a varying range of indicators to assess their sustainability. Through a literature review, this research aims to develop a framework of sustainability indicators that can serve as a reference for future research in waste-to-energy systems. Utilising this framework could helpd to advance SDG 7.2 to increase the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix.

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