Climate change

Reviews and explains the challenges posed by mycotoxins on food safety, which have consequences on the health of consumers and livestock. Also discusses the prospects of mycotoxin outbreaks in a world climate change scenario. Supports SDG 2: Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
Elsevier, The Lancet Planetary Health, Volume 5, June 2021
Temperature affects many life processes, but its effect might be expected to differ among eukaryotic organisms inhabiting similar environments. We reviewed literature on temperature thresholds of humans, livestock, poultry, agricultural crops, and sparse examples of fisheries. We found that preferable and harmful temperatures are similar for humans, cattle, pigs, poultry, fish, and agricultural crops. Preferable temperatures range from 17°C to 24°C. Stress temperature thresholds are lower when humidity is higher.
This book chapter advances SDG 14 by explaining how biological factors that influence microbial structure and activity in coastal sediments include the various interactions between microorganisms involving trophic interactions such as competition, predation, and parasitism; between microbes and plants as well as the influence of benthic animals in the sediments.
Elsevier,

Preparing a Workforce for the New Blue Economy, People, Products and Policies, 2021, Pages 3-16

This book chapter advances SDGs 9, 13, and 15 by explaining how the blue economy of the future will be heavily dependent on national investments in ocean sciences, ocean-related technologies, and intelligent national policy creation about the national interest in the world ocean.
Elsevier,

Environmental Systems Science, Theory and Practical Applications, 2021, Pages 509-542

This book chapter advances SDGs 9, 13, and 15 by introducing techniques for assessing economics and feasibility to complement the technical and scientific rigor in environmental systems science. This includes attention to project planning and communicating decisions and working with stakeholders and emission reduction and prevention strategies, including fuel-related and air toxics strategies.
This book chapter addresses SDG 9 and 17 by explaining the evolution of the blue economy. From the moment it moved offshore, the oil and gas industry had a requirement for the skills of geotechnical engineers, geoscientists, meteorologists, and oceanographers to ensure that activities were conducted efficiently and safely, and a core element of the new blue economy was created. The migration into deeper water created new challenges, and the industry invests heavily in scientific studies, and research and development, to overcome them. In many cases, oil and gas companies form consortiums that support collaborative research conducted jointly by academic and industry scientists. As the level of engagement with the ocean observing community has grown, the industry has released much of its data into the public domain and supported the development of appropriate degrees and training to ensure that the new blue economy has a capable workforce. As the balance of energy moves away from hydrocarbons to renewable energy sources, and new industries emerge such as deep-sea mining, requiring the services of ocean scientists, the new blue economy created by the oil and gas industry will be well equipped to serve their needs.
To mark World Environment Day 2021, RELX’s Global Head of Corporate Responsibility, Dr Márcia Balisciano, talks to Dr Dan Fiscus and Dr Brian Fath about this year's theme: Ecosystem Restoration. 
Elsevier,

Climate Change Science, Causes, Effects and Solutions for Global Warming, 2021, Pages 223-246

This book chapter advances SDGs 9 and 13 by discussing how designing smart building technology to satisfy the net energy and water needs of a building provides an innovative technology for mitigating global energy, environmental, and climate vulnerability.
Thanks to fast learning and sustained growth, solar photovoltaics (PV) is today a highly cost-competitive technology, ready to contribute substantially to CO2 emissions mitigation. However, many scenarios assessing global decarbonization pathways, either based on integrated assessment models or partial-equilibrium models, fail to identify the key role that this technology could play, including far lower future PV capacity than that projected by the PV community.
Elsevier, Trends in Food Science and Technology, Volume 111, May 2021
Background: Coffee is of the most traded commodities in the world and its market has grown regularly over the last 150 years. During production and processing of coffee beans many by-products are generated such as skin, pulp, mucilage, parchment, silverskin, and immature /defective coffee beans. Around 50% of coffee fruit is discard and can contaminate the environment. Scope and approach: The purpose of this review is to raise potential applications for coffee by-products in topical formulations. Besides, to present the main bioactive compounds responsible for their biological activity.

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