Climate change

Earth Day is widely recognised as the largest secular observance in the world, marked by more than a billion people every year as a day of action to change human behaviour and provoke policy changes. This day recognises and celebrates the Earth and its ecosystems as our home and highlights the need to protect earth to enhance people’s livelihoods, counteract climate change, and stop the collapse of biodiversity. To raise awareness of Earth Day 2021, Elsevier presents a curated list of free access journal articles and book chapters in support of this year's theme - Restore our Earth.
The EU Parliament voted to fast-track an inclusion of shipping into the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) as of 2022. This white paper provides an in-depth analysis of maritime ETS and its impact on the shipping industry, contributing to SDGs 12 and 13.
Contributing to SDGs 9, 12 and 13, this paper provides an in-depth analysis of the technologies available to reduce CO2 emissions in those sectors, and the implications for introducing consistent measures to deliver on emission reduction targets.
Nexis Newsdesk™ has created graphics on the SDGs and the Global Media Landscape, offering charts & insights into global media coverage of the Sustainable Development Goals. View findings for Global Goal 13.
A Commentary on the Healthy People 2030 roadmap, in the context of SDGs 3 and 10, focusing specifically on the potential of this initiative in addressing upstream determinants of health to achieve health equity across the USA.
This book chapter advances SDGs 3, 12, and 13 by discussing carbonaceous aerosols that are one of the important components of the aerosol and play a significant role in changing climate, fluctuating air quality and health of the living being.
This book chapter advances SDGs 3, 12 and 13 by discussing the entrance of microplastics in a range of environments, including oceans, surface waters, wastewaters, soils, sediments, the atmosphere, and food.
The need to assess major infrastructure performance under a changing climate is widely recognized yet rarely practiced, particularly in rapidly growing African economies. Here, we consider high-stakes investments across the water, energy, and food sectors for two major river basins in a climate transition zone in Africa. We integrate detailed interpretation of observed and modeled climate-system behavior with hydrological modeling and decision-relevant performance metrics.
Elsevier, Global Environmental Change, Volume 67, March 2021
Our carbon-intensive economy has led to an average temperature rise of 1 °C since pre-industrial times. As a consequence, the world has seen increasing droughts, significant shrinking of the polar ice caps, and steady sea-level rise. To stall these issues’ worsening further, we must limit global warming to 1.5 °C. In addition to the economy's decarbonization, this endeavour requires the use of negative-emissions technologies (NETs) that remove the main greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, from the atmosphere.
The climate emergency and population growth are challenging water security and sustainable urban design in cities worldwide. Sustainable urban development is crucial to minimise pressures on the natural environment and on existing urban infrastructure systems, including water, energy, and land. These pressures are particularly evident in London, which is considered highly vulnerable to water shortages and floods and where there has been a historical shortage of housing. However, the impacts of urban growth on environmental management and protection are complex and difficult to evaluate.

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