Climate change

This article highlights the winning proposals of the fifth edition of the Elsevier Foundation Green & Sustainable Chemistry Challenge. The winning proposals were chosen for their innovative green chemistry aspects and their large positive impact on the environment, contributing to SDGs 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14 and 15.
2019 Elsevier Foundation Green and Sustainable Chemistry Challenge second prize winner, Dr. Ankur Patwardhan
In 2019, Dr. Ankur Patwardhan, Head of the Biodiversity Department at Maharashtra Education Society’s Abasaheb Garware College, Pune, India, was awarded the second prize in the Elsevier Foundation Green and Sustainable Chemistry Challenge. Contributing to SDGs 13 and 15, his project, “Butterfly attractant for pollination and ecosystem health”, focused on the plant-pollinator interactions that play a vital role in maintaining ecosystem balance and aimed at enhancing floral visits by butterflies through the development of natural attractant formulations. One year later, we interviewed Dr. Patwardhan about his experience at the Challenge, as well as the upcoming steps for his project.
Elsevier,

Global Groundwater. Source, Scarcity, Sustainability, Security, and Solutions, 2021, Pages 503-517

This chapter advances SDG 6 by presenting opportunities for groundwater and how information can be shared across disciplines- e.g. Many commercial operations (e.g., oil and gas, geothermal, mining) create a wealth of geological and hydrogeological information in their everyday exploration activities that can be used by groundwater professionals.
Elsevier,

Global Groundwater. Source, Scarcity, Sustainability, Security, and Solutions, 2021, Pages 577-583

This chapter advances SDG 6 by presenting an overview and consideration for groundwater desalination, including a framework tool.
Elsevier,

Galapagos Giant Tortoises, Biodiversity of World: Conservation from Genes to Landscapes, 2021, Pages 503-509

This book chapter advances SDGs 13, 14, and 15 by presenting a framework for prioritizing future conservation efforts. The chapter ends with a vision of Galapagos tortoise populations 200–300 years from now—as they follow a slow, steady path to full recovery.
This book chapter addresses goals 14, 13 and 6 by looking at climate change and the threats to deep sea benthic habitats.
Solar power is a renewable energy source. An increase in solar power can see a pivot from coal-fired power, a major source of air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Global Citizen campaigns on the United Nations’ Global Goals, including goal 7 for affordable and clean energy and goal 13 for climate action. The Global Goals specifically call on all nations to invest in sustainability and renewable power.
Climate change is reshaping the comparative advantage of regions and hence driving migration flows, principally toward urban areas. Migration has multiple benefits and costs in both origin and destination regions. Coordinated policies that recognize how and why people move can reduce future costs and facilitate adaptation to climate change both within borders and internationally.
Wolf-Peter Schill is Deputy Head of the Energy, Transportation, Environment Department at the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), where he leads the research area Transformation of the Energy Economy. He engages in open-source power sector modeling, which he applies to economic analyses of renewable energy integration, energy storage, and sector coupling. He holds a diploma in environmental engineering and a doctoral degree in economics from Technische Universität Berlin.
The dichotomous divide between vegetarians and omnivores seems clear: Omnivores eat meat, whereas vegetarians do not. Yet classifying people dichotomously as vegetarian or omnivorous overlooks a distinct group of people who limit their meat intake but still include some meat in their diets: a group of “mostly vegetarian” dieters called flexitarians (a term combining the words, “flexible” and “vegetarian”).

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