Education

Different lines of research have argued that specific groups, such as boys or ethnic minorities, are more prone to develop an anti-school culture than others, leading to group differences in the social acceptance of high performers. Taking an ecological view, we ask to what extent the school context promotes or prevents the emergence of group-specific oppositional cultures. Theoretically, we argue that group-based oppositional cultures become more likely in schools with low socio-economic resources and in schools where socio-economic differences align with demographic attributes.
Establishing sustainable training to strengthen human resources for health for children's nursing in Africa requires stakeholders to navigate complex pathways spanning multiple regulatory systems and sectors. Incomplete stakeholder insight threatens long-term sustainability of new training programmes.
The International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is celebrated every year on March 21st. Elsevier has selected and curated a number of journal articles and book chapters in a dedicated Special issue to highlight this important theme. These articles are freely available to read and share. #fightracism #Standup4humanrights
Objectives: Health inequities exist for racial groups as a result of political, societal, historical and economic injustices, such as colonisation and racism. To address this, health professions have applied various health education pedagogies to equip learners to contribute better to cultural safety. The aim of this realist review was to provide an overview of cultural safety programs that evaluate transition of learning to practice to generate program theory as to what strategies best translate cultural safety theory to practice for nurses and midwives.
Objectives: To synthesize literature about teaching social justice to nursing students and identify approaches for effective teaching of social justice issues in nursing education. Design: An integrative review. Data sources: Literature was searched in CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, and OVID databases. In total, 32 articles were assessed for full-text eligibility, and 18 articles published from January 2011 until August 2021 were critically appraised and reviewed. Review methods: Articles were appraised using Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool.
 The relationship between healthy lifestyles and wellbeing, especially focused on women and pregnancy, continues to grow to understand and determine factors connected to chronic disease and to decrease them. Supports SDG target: 3.2 By 2030, end preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age, with all countries aiming to reduce neonatal mortality to at least as low as 12 per 1,000 live births and under‑5 mortality to at least as low as 25 per 1,000 live births
Problem: Within maternity care policies and practice, pregnant migrant women are regarded as a vulnerable population. Background: Women's experiential knowledge is a key element of woman-centred care but is insufficiently addressed in midwifery practice and research that involves migrant women. Aim: To examine if pregnant migrant women's experiential knowledge of vulnerability corresponds with sets of criteria of vulnerability, and to explore how migrant women make sense of vulnerability during pregnancy.
Research4Life has been providing free and low-cost access to scientific research in the developing world for 20 years. Read this insightful story about the history of Research4Life, and its new strategy for the future with the aim to help researchers in the developing world fully participate in the global research community. This relates to SDG 4, 10 & 17.
The London Book Fair is the global marketplace for story creators. As a leading event organiser we bring whole industries together which can advance sustainability – playing a role in educating and influencing behaviour with a large number of stakeholders. The London Book Fair advances SDG 4 - Quality Education.
Elsevier, Women's Studies International Forum, Volume 90, 1 January 2022
Featuring original data, this article examines an elaborate network of gendered patterns in the faculty labor pool for the twenty-two English doctoral programs in Canada. Although the gendered distributions seem to approach numerical parity, the more nuanced the analyses, the less equitable these distributions appear. When juxtaposed with Statistics Canada data on English doctoral recipients, such patterns betray unsettling structural inequities for women scholars.

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