Food security and nutrition and sustainable agriculture

The study addresses how food production can continue using reduced water whilst at the same time bring about improved health. The growing population in India will have an impact on water availability to be used in agriculture and so the study looks at dietary patterns which use less water. They find important synergies in diets with lower water use and positive health effects. This is in-line with the achievement of SDG 2, its related targets and to a further extent SDG 6.
This study has investigated how smallholder farmers contribute to our global food supply. They looked at where farms are located, what type of commodities are produced (plants, livestock’s or fish) from farms of different sizes and their nutrition implications. They found that small farms produce 75–100% of all cereal in North America and South America, Australia, and New Zealand , livestock, and fruit in these regions, whereas small farms (<20 ha) found in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, southeast Asia, and China produce 75% of food commodities globally. This is in line with the attainment of SDG 2.
Maize growing under plastic

Critics claim that maize can cause unwanted environmental impacts. But supporters of the crop are able to show how by use of cover crops it can be grown responsibly, reducing or eliminating, for example, nutrient leaching and soil erosion. In south-west England, a Wessex Water project is using cover crops to protect and improve drinking water quality by working with growers whose farms surround boreholes and reservoirs that supply water for human consumption. Steps like this can contribute to SDG 6 to ensure sustainable management of water and SDG 12 to ensure sustainable production.

This is a timely article with potential to tackle multiple fronts of sustainable development with regards to agricultural intensification and green revolution which are currently taking precedence in most developing countries as a means of boosting productivity and ensuring food security. Given the high dependence of the modern global food production system on the continuous supply of commercial phosphorus (P) fertilizers, this study presents a detailed, methodical, and up to date assessment of the key sustainability challenges for the global P resource, and highlights their implications for global food security. This article addresses SDG 2; SDG 12; SDG 14 and SDG 15.
The Blueprint for Business Leadership on the SDGs aims to inspire all business — regardless of size, sector or geography — to take leading action in support of the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It illustrates how the five leadership qualities of Ambition, Collaboration, Accountability, Consistency, and Intentional can be applied to a business' strategy, business model, products, supply chain, partnerships, and operations to raise the bar and create impact at scale. The Blueprint is a tool for any business that is ready to advance its principled approach to SDG action to become a leader. This chapter relates specifically to SDG 2.
Elsevier,

Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, Volume 20, 2016, Pages 402-406

Aquaponics is an innovative smart and sustainable production system for integrating aquaculture with hydroponic vegetable crops, that can play a crucial role in the future of environmental and socio-economic sustainability in smart cities. Aquaponics can play a key role enabling local production with short supply chains in the cities. This contributes to sustainable production addressed in SDG 12 as well as the connection to SDG 2.
This article reports the most recent assessment of the global burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors and says that reductions in exposure have been key drivers of change for only a small set of environmental risks, including sanitation, household air pollution, and behavioural risks (eg, undernutrition and smoking). Understanding these risks helps to inform the achievement of SDG 3 targets.
A farmer in Uganda
Lucy Ajok, a 34 year old Ugandan farmer, gives Farmers Weekly an insight into her rural life. Lucy is a single mother of five children and lives on a three-acre farm practising mixed farming. Farming families dependent on family labour, like Lucy's, are typically the poorest in Uganda, and often have the additional challenge of HIV. This interview shares some of the challenges faced in achieving SDG 1 and SDG 2.
The role of agriculture in flood risk mitigation has been largely overlooked in the UK government’s national flood resilience review. Farm leaders are concerned that the review contains little mention of agriculture, rural communities or food security. This highlights the need to address flood risk mitigation holistically to support SDG 13.1 to strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters, and SDG 2.4 to implement resilient agricultural practices that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, including flooding.
An autonomous harvester starts to cut robot-grown barley
The groundbreaking Hands Free Hectare project has just seen its first harvest. This £200,000 Innovation UK-funded project by Harper Adams University with Precision Decisions has modified existing machinery to drill, sow, spray and harvest the crop without any human control. The project aims to show how automation can facilitate a sustainable farming system where multiple smaller, lighter machines will enter the field, minimising the level of compaction (SDG 15, life on land and SDG 9, industry, innovation and infrastructure).

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