Sustainable cities and human settlements

This paper uses ‘Medieval’ drought conditions from the 12th Century to simulate the implications of severe and persistent drought for the future of water resource management in metropolitan Phoenix, one of the largest and fastest growing urban areas in the southwestern USA. Anticipatory models enable long-term policy analysis for climate change. Mega-drought results in unsustainable groundwater use between 2000 and 2060. Aggressive drought management policies can produce sustainable yield. The time to manage droughts is before they occur. This relates to SDG 6, SDG 11 and SDG 13.

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 398-406

Water harvesting is an ancient practice that has been used, mainly in dry environments, to increase efficiency of water collection and use by directing water from a large natural watershed or man-made collection surface into a small basin where the water can be stored in underground reservoirs or to be used directly for irrigation or domestic uses. In modern era water harvesting has been neglected, particularly at the developed countries, due to the technological achievements in the fields of water production and transport. This relates to SDG 6 and SDG 11.
London’s ability to remain a world-leading city in an increasingly globalised economy is dependent on it being an efficient, low-risk place to do business and a desirable place to live. This article provides a framework for adaptation planning in urban water supply systems relating to SDG 6 and SDG 11.
This study used social indicators to assess stormwater management. There is a lack of awareness about environmental regulations related to fertilizer use. Social dimensions are crucial in sustainable stormwater management. This addresses SDG 6 and SDG 11.

Sustainable Cities and Society,Volume 27, 2016,Pages 448-456,ISSN 2210-6707


Water reuse networks have been emerging globally for the last 50 years. This article reviews the economic, social and environmental issues related to implementing water reuse networks in cities. This is reflecting the fact that globally many cities are categorised as water scarce areas, where there is growing imbalance between water demand and availability. In this sense, there is a need for sustainable water supply solutions in the imminent future to provide and maintain service reliability, particularly in the face of climate change.


Futures, Available online 19 October 2016

Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) is vital for advancing the SDGs. This paper looks at transformative learning that prepares students for societal change. The discussion is grounded both in theories about hope from disparate scientific disciplines and in empirical research about young people’s hope concerning global climate change. These insights particularly inform SDG 4.7 to ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, as well as SDGs 3, 11 and 13.
Reed Exhibitions,

 World Travel Market, 27 September 2016

Tourists walking through Barcelona
Overtourism' is likely to become a commonplace term over the next few years as the travel industry grapples with sustainable tourism. Addressing the issues faced will help to advance SDG 8.9 to devise and implement policies to promote sustainable tourism that create jobs and promote local culture and products as well as SDG 11.4 to strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage.
On-site energy storage systems can be used in both domestic and commercial buildings to address the increasing demand on electricity. This would require energy to be purchased at off-peak times and stored for use during peak times. Despite a number of benefits to on-site energy storage systems, they are not yet an economically viable solution, although by 2021 costs are expected to fall significantly. Future-proofing buildings in the form of battery technology supports SDG 7 - affordable and clean energy.
In the US, land owners are liable for environmental impacts in relation to contaminated land. This Lexis Practice Advisor practice note explains what due diligence should be carried out in relation to the purchase of land/buildings to assess the environmental risk. Environmental due diligence advances SDG 3.9 to substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination, and generally supports SDG 11 Sustainable cities and SDG 15 Life on land.
The energy performance of buildings draw on a large body of operational data. Applying analytical tools, such as data mining technologies, enables high volumes of data to be examined and applied to be able to make improvements in energy performance. This paper highlights recent advances in the two main data mining tasks in the building field and clearly shows interconnectedness between SDG 11 Sustainable cities and communities and SDG 9 Industry, innovation and infrastructure.