Sustainable consumption and production

Urban source separation infrastructure systems have a promising potential for a more sustainable management of household food waste and wastewaters. A renewed trend of larger implementations of pilot areas with such systems is currently emerging in Northern Europe. This study investigates the drivers behind the decision of stakeholders to implement source separation systems as well as the importance of the previously existing pilot areas in the decision-making process.
This chapter considers the developments in agricultural technology required to fully achieve SDG 2 (zero hunger) can sometimes be detrimental to the environment. Climate smart technologies are needed.
For many years, the negative environmental impact of plastic mass production was either ignored or underestimated. Fortunately, in the last two decades, strategies for the synthesis and degradation of plastics have been re-evaluated and have led to major advances in the development of (bio-) degradable and recyclable plastics. In her Catalysis article, Dr. García reiterates the environmental issues caused by plastics and gives a scholarly overview of both general and plastic-specific strategies for recycling. She concludes this piece by providing a perspective on the most promising options for making plastics more sustainable and a force for good rather than a source of pollution, supporting SDG 12. This article has triggered three reactions.
Elsevier,

Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, Volume 20, 2016, Pages 402-406

Aquaponics is an innovative smart and sustainable production system for integrating aquaculture with hydroponic vegetable crops, that can play a crucial role in the future of environmental and socio-economic sustainability in smart cities. Aquaponics can play a key role enabling local production with short supply chains in the cities. This contributes to sustainable production addressed in SDG 12 as well as the connection to SDG 2.
The detection of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), known as emerging contaminants (ECs), in the environment has attracted growing concern due to their toxicity and potential hazard to the ecosystems and humans. These contaminants are consumed at high quantities worldwide and they are released deliberately or accidentally into the water resources.The conventional treatment technologies that use biological processes cannot effectively remove these contaminants. Therefore, the development of efficient and sustainable removal methods for these emerging contaminants is essential.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 484-496, ISSN 2210-6707

World map of the 142 cities in the UrbMet database.
The sustainability of urban water systems is often compared in small numbers of cases selected as much for their familiarity as for their similarities and differences. Few studies examine large urban datasets to conduct comparisons that identify unexpected similarities and differences among urban water systems and problems. This work supports quantitative comparison of urban water sustainability. Cities were clustered to identify a typology of urban water management profiles. Clustering was based on per capita consumption, population, and annual water budget. This relates to SDG 6, 11 and 12.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27,2016,Pages 457-466,ISSN 2210-6707,

Broad community support is required to drive progress on SDG 6 and to ensure future water security. This paper explores how social capital, measured by involvement in community organisations, might influence support for alternative water schemes. Research was conducted on a representative sample of Australian adults and highlight the importance of social capital in building engagement in water-related issues.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 430-438, ISSN 2210-6707,

Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) infrastructure are conventionally designed based on historical climate data. Yet, variability in rainfall intensities and patterns caused by climate change have a significant impact on the performance of an urban drainage system. Although rainwater harvesting (RWH) is a potential solution to manage stormwater in urban areas, its benefits in mitigating the climate change impacts on combined sewer networks have not been assessed yet. Hence, the goal of the present study was set to evaluate the effectiveness of RWH in alleviating the potential impacts of climate change on CSOs. This relates to SDG 6,11 and 12.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 467-474, ISSN 2210-6707

Water recycling schemes are a viable solution to limitations on water supply and yet public acceptance of these schemes is low. Advancing SDGs 6, 11 and 12, research was conducted in three metropolitan areas in the US to assess basic perceptions of treated wastewater occurrence and its acceptance in the public water supply. De facto reuse occurs at rates across the three cities higher than what is perceived. Roughly 25% of respondents perceive de facto reuse to occur in their home tap water. Respondents who perceived de facto reuse to occur at their tap were ten times more likely to have a high level of acceptance.
ICIS,

ICIS EPCA Supplement 2015, pages 56-57, 26 September 2016

Future progress on managing climate change is in our hands
Landmark emissions targets were outlined at the COP21 meeting in Paris in 2015 and the chemical industry will play an important role in achieving them. The support of the chemical industry is vital for advancing SDG 13.2 to integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning. This report also emphasises the opportunities that climate action brings to the chemical industry.

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