Theory

Elsevier, American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Volume 77, June 2021
Kidney disease continues to manifest stark racial inequities in the United States, revealing the entrenchment of racism and bias within multiple facets of society, including in our institutions, practices, norms, and beliefs. In this perspective, we synthesize theory and evidence to describe why an understanding of race and racism is integral to kidney care, providing examples of how kidney health disparities manifest interpersonal and structural racism.
Objectives: People with life-limiting diseases such as dementia are living longer. How to improve the quality of life of those living with dementia is an important challenge for society. Continuity maintenance in older adulthood is a psychosocial adaptation strategy by searching for preference and familiarity, making a sense of connection, and creating coherence. Continuity maintenance is a useful concept for effective dementia care, which could bring psychosocial benefits. This review investigates effective ways of continuity maintenance for people with dementia (PWD).
Men are more likely than women to perpetrate nearly all types of interpersonal violence (e.g. intimate partner violence, murder, assault, rape). While public health programs target prevention efforts for each type of violence, there are rarely efforts that approach the prevention of violence holistically and attempt to tackle its common root causes. Drawing upon theories that explain the drivers of violence, we examine how gender norms, including norms and social constructions of masculinity, are at the root of most physical violence perpetration by men against women and against other men.
Elsevier, Transport Policy, Volume 20, March 2012
The late 1990s and early 2000s witnessed a growing interest amongst UK academics and policy makers in the issue of transport disadvantage and, more innovatively, how this might relate to growing concerns about the social exclusion of low income groups and communities. Studies (predominantly in the United Kingdom) began to make more explicit the links policy between poverty, transport disadvantage, access to key services and economic and social exclusion (see for example Church and Frost, 2000; .