Urban Heat Island

Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect, a phenomenon where urban areas are significantly warmer than their surrounding rural areas, interrelates with several Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It directly affects SDG 11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities) as it degrades urban living conditions by increasing energy consumption, elevating emission levels, compromising human health, and impacting urban ecosystems. The UHI effect also correlates with SDG 13 (Climate Action) since urban warming exacerbates the overall global warming problem and requires mitigation measures. Furthermore, it ties into SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-being) as excessive heat can lead to heat-related illnesses and exacerbate existing health conditions. Additionally, by promoting greener, cooler city designs to counteract the UHI effect, we can contribute to SDG 15 (Life on Land) by expanding urban green spaces that support biodiversity.

Elsevier,

Mohamed Dardir, Umberto Berardi, Chapter 13 - Air quality and heat-related health impacts of increasing urban greenery cover, Editor(s): Ansar Khan, Hashem Akbari, Francesco Fiorito, Sk Mithun, Dev Niyogi, Global Urban Heat Island Mitigation, Elsevier, 2022, Pages 269-300, ISBN 9780323855396, https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-323-85539-6.00008-1.

This chapter advances UN SDG goals 11, 13, and 3 by developing an integrated approach, including statistical data elaborations and microclimate simulations, to look at the impact of increasing the urban green infrastructure on the urban environment, air quality levels, and heat-related health responses.
Elsevier,

Sabiha Sultana, A.N.V. Satyanarayana, Chapter 4 - Urban heat island: land cover changes, management, and mitigation strategies, Editor(s): Ansar Khan, Hashem Akbari, Francesco Fiorito, Sk Mithun, Dev Niyogi, Global Urban Heat Island Mitigation, Elsevier, 2022, Pages 71-93, ISBN 9780323855396, https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-323-85539-6.00009-3.

This chapter advances UN SDG goals 11, 13, and 3 by discussing Remote Sensing-based strategies for managing land cover and ultimately mitigating anthropogenic heating and excess emission of GHG and pollutants by promoting green belts, vast plantation programs, and utilizing carbon-credit projects.
This article supports SDGs 9, 11 and 13 by employing an Urban-Water-Energy (UWE)-Nexus approach to understand water and energy demand and their interactions in both space and time for Rhode Island and quantifies the extent and exposure of the Urban Heat Island effects among its towns and urban populations using high-resolution details.

As global temperatures continue to rise, questions about infrastructure capacity to keep up with energy demand are increasingly germane. Energy demand is mediated by several structural and environmental conditions, though we have a limited understanding about the role of differences in local ambient temperatures as a predictor for energy demand. This study assesses the effects of residential building structure, socio-demographics, and ambient temperature conditions of a neighborhood to overall energy expenditures of a household.

Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 19, December 2015

The elevated air temperature of a city, urban heat island (UHI), increases the heat and pollution-related mortality, reduces the habitats' comfort and elevates the mean and peak energy demand of buildings. To countermeasure this unwanted phenomenon, a series of strategies and policies have been proposed and adapted to the cities. Various types of models are developed to evaluate the effectiveness of such strategies in addition to predict the UHI. This paper explains the compatibility of each type of model suitable for various objectives and scales of UHI studies.