Vaccines

Objective: Although the benefits of vaccines are widely recognized by medical experts, public opinion about vaccination policies is mixed. We analyze public opinion about vaccination policies to assess whether Dunning-Kruger effects can help to explain anti-vaccination policy attitudes. Rationale: People low in autism awareness – that is, the knowledge of basic facts and dismissal of misinformation about autism – should be the most likely to think that they are better informed than medical experts about the causes of autism (a Dunning-Kruger effect).
Infectious diseases have proven to be remarkably resilient foes of human health and so the prevention and control of infectious diseases have been attracting the attention of all countries over the world. Vaccination is an effective way to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. However, vaccination is a long-standing social dilemmas due to the vaccine's risk by itself and the spread of infectious diseases in the population depends on not only the pathogen itself, but also the impact of social network structures.
Vaccine "hesitancy" is an emerging term in the literature and discourse on vaccine decision-making and determinants of vaccine acceptance.