Wastewater

Elsevier, Current Research in Green and Sustainable Chemistry, Volume 5, January 2022
Various microorganisms as a source of green technology used for bio-inspired wastewater treatment (WWT).
Overuse of water has led to the degradation and scarcity of limited water resources, which prompted the modern world to adopt sustainable measures to save water by increasing its reuse and recycling. The use of microbial-based green technology to treat wastewater has appeared to outweigh conventional wastewater treatment (WWT) technologies because this emerging technology overcomes many of the shortcomings of conventional treatment systems.
After 10 years of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident, Japan decided on 13 April 2021 to release the nuclear wastewater into the Pacific Ocean. It is apparent that Japan has chosen the most cost-efficient way to deal with the contaminated water, however, great opposition and concerns have been aroused internationally due to the harmful ecotoxicological features of radioactive materials. Here we analyze the ecological impacts caused by the nuclear accident and the potential impacts of releasing the nuclear wastewater into the ocean.
Climate change and population growth generates a decrease in water availability around the world which can compromise the maintenance of sustainable agriculture. Thus, treated wastewater (TWW) became an alternative to minimize water shortage. However, this may indirectly affect the soil's microbial properties. In this study different soils irrigated for 0, 1, 8 and 20 years with TWW were sampled and from the east central region of Tunisia.
The potential of electron-donating capability in methoxy groups of antioxidant containing protein (ACAP) as organic catalyst is restricted by its low isoelectric point. The goal of this study is to construct endure ACAP based metal-free organic catalyst for hydrogen production from electrolysis of noodle wastewater. The ACAP was coated thermomechanically on PVC sheet and its performance was tested during electrolysis of noodle wastewater. The morphological analysis, phase analysis, and elemental analysis of coated materials have shown a simultaneous pattern with electrolysis performances.
Elsevier, Geography and Sustainability, Volume 1, March 2020
Water footprint (WF) measures human appropriation of water resources for consumptive use of surface and ground water (blue WF) and soil water (green WF) and for assimilating polluted water (grey WF). Questions have been often asked about the exact meaning behind the numbers from WF accounting. However, to date environmental sustainability of WF has never been assessed at the sub-national level over time. This study evaluated the environmental sustainability of blue, green and grey WF for China's 31 mainland provinces in 2002, 2007 and 2012, and identified the unsustainable hotspots.
As the Millennium Development Goals did earlier, the Sustainable Development Goals have mobilised the international community into what can be the most important, although the most challenging, development goals of the 21st century. However, a main limitation has been that the SDGs considered as a baseline the inaccurate figures that were presented by the UN at the end of the MDGs. These figures were not challenged, not even by the academic community, who in many cases has used them uncritically.