How can innovations in chemistry, energy, and biotechnology jointly be applied in low-resource settings for the benefit of a community? This LabLinks meeting combines the expertise in the applied biosciences of Trends in Biotechnology, Joule’s interest in both scientific and sustainability developments in energy, and Chem’s focus on basic chemical science with relevance to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Planetary Health, Volume 1, Issue 2, May 2017, Pages e48-e49

This brief article presents a renewed and strengthened version of Kate Raworth’s well-known Doughnut model, which describes the social and ecological boundaries to human wellbeing. The model shows twelve dimensions and their illustrative indicators are derived from internationally agreed minimum standards for human wellbeing, and it relates to nearly all of the SDGs.
Open defecation is a major global health problem. The number of open defecators in India dwarfs that of other states and most live in rural places. Attempts to end rural open defecation by targeting individuals, like social marketing or behaviour change approaches, often ignore the structural inequalities that shape rural residents’ everyday lives. Our study explores the role of remoteness in sustaining open defecation in rural India, advancing knowledge on SDG 6. We deploy the concept of remoteness as an analytical tool that can capture everyday practices of open defecation as a function of physical and social distance.
This study illustrates how consumer social risk footprints can assist in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). For their social footprint, The authors select 4 indicators related to five of the UN's SDGs: gender equality (SDG 5 also 8.5 & 8.8); mother and child health (SDG 3, especially 3.1 & 3.2); governance (SDG 16, especially 16.5 & 16.6); and access to clean water (SDG 6, especially 6.1 & 6.2). The results discussed are important for the UN in developing partnerships to address the SDG's and for organisations such as the World Bank, Trade Unions and NGOs' work towards a fairer world.
The study addresses how food production can continue using reduced water whilst at the same time bring about improved health. The growing population in India will have an impact on water availability to be used in agriculture and so the study looks at dietary patterns which use less water. They find important synergies in diets with lower water use and positive health effects. This is in-line with the achievement of SDG 2, its related targets and to a further extent SDG 6.
Maize growing under plastic

Critics claim that maize can cause unwanted environmental impacts. But supporters of the crop are able to show how by use of cover crops it can be grown responsibly, reducing or eliminating, for example, nutrient leaching and soil erosion. In south-west England, a Wessex Water project is using cover crops to protect and improve drinking water quality by working with growers whose farms surround boreholes and reservoirs that supply water for human consumption. Steps like this can contribute to SDG 6 to ensure sustainable management of water and SDG 12 to ensure sustainable production.

Pollutec 2018 logo
POLLUTEC is a world leading exhibition of environmental equipment technologies and services, the first ever event to focus on environment as a professional sector and has been at the heart of environment innovation since 1978. Pollutec provides a critical platform for the environment and climate change, bringing together environment professionals and technologists from across the world in Lyon. Pollutec’s major fields are: Water; Waste Management and Recycling; Instrumentation, Metrology, Automation; Risks Management (industrial & environmental); Air Quality; Sites and Soils Management (and Recovery); Energy (and sub-sectors such as biogas, renewables and energy efficiency) which are directly related to SDGs: 6,7,9,11,12,13,14,15
Giving the World Access to Water - Elsevier Atlas
Despite the increased attention the sixth Sustainable Development Goal (clean water and sanitation) has brought, access to water in Sub-Saharan Africa is worse than ever: there are more people without access to water now than there were in 1990. In order to fix the problem we need to understand what’s going wrong with our current approaches. That was the aim of an Atlas Award-winning study published in Water Resources and Rural Development, by researchers at Glasgow Caledonian University in Scotland, the University of Malawi in Malawi and the University of Lusaka in Zambia. Interestingly enough, since women and school aged girls are typically tasked with water fetching, by providing water access and sanitation authors feel there is an effect on others SDG like SDG 10 (reduced inequalities), SDG 4 (quality education) and SDG 5 (gender equality)
The International Water Summit (IWS) is a global platform for promoting water sustainability in arid regions by bringing together world leaders, field experts, academics and business innovators to accelerate the development of new sustainable strategies and technologies. Videos from the 2017 summit cover a wide range of technologies and innovations which support SDG 6 Clean Water and Sanitation and SDG 11 Sustainable Cities and Communities.
Elsevier,

Climate Risk Management, Volume 16, 2017, Pages 59-72

As the climate continues to change, climate scientists have projected changes in water quantities available for human and other uses. This quantitative study examines how in the US, state water plans and state hazard mitigation plans address climate change. The primary objective of this study is to determine what drives states to plan for the impacts of a changing climate, addressing SDG 13 on climate action.

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