National Sustainable Development Strategies (NSDS)

Ecological infrastructure (EI) refers to ecosystems that deliver services to society, functioning as a nature-based equivalent of, or complement to, built infrastructure. EI is critical for socio-economic development, supporting a suite of development imperatives at local, national and international scales. This paper presents the myriad of ways that EI supports sustainable development, using South Africa and the South African National Development Plan as a case study, linking to the Sustainable Development Goals on a global level. We show the need for EI across numerous development and sustainability issues, including food security, water provision, and poverty alleviation contributing to several SDGs not least, goals 1, 11 and 17.
SDG 17 is concerned with official development assistance and partnerships for the goals. This paper examines the tension that arises between foreign aid agencies delivering on their altruistic commitments whilst at the same time serving the national interests of donor governments.
This overview provides guidance on the concepts of sustainability and corporate responsibility as understood under UK law, including the institutional framework for sustainable development. This guidance is relevant to all SDGs and in particular to SDGs 9, 11, and 12.
Public rental housing (PRH) projects are the mainstream of China's new affordable housing policies. This study proposes an assessment model of the integrated sustainability for PRH projects. Integration of sustainability in PRH projects like these can contribute to advancing SDG 11.3 to enhance sustainable urbanization and capacity for participatory, integrated and sustainable human settlement planning and management in all countries.
Elsevier,

Forest Policy and Economics, December 2014, Pages 23 - 33

Reducing emissions from deforestation requires policy change. This paper investigates how governance systems and their discursive practices are affecting policies aimed at reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries: it highlights the challenges to the advancement of SDG 15.1 to ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, in line with obligations under international agreements by promoting conservation, restoration and sustainable use of these ecosystems and their services.
For economic development to succeed in Africa in the next 50 years, African agriculture will have to change beyond recognition. Production will have to increased alongside labour productivity, requiring a vast reduction in the proportion of the population engaged in agriculture and a large move out of rural areas.These changes directly contribute to the advancement of SDG 2 and 15 to increase food production in order to minimise hunger, with the help of sustainable methods of doing so to maintain functioning ecosystems.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volume 8, October 2014, Pages 15–22

Increasing smallscale agriculture is a must for sub-Saharan Africa. This intensification provides a component for producing more food to support the growing population in this area and means reaching SDG target 2.3 to increase incomes of food producers, in particular women, indigenous people and family farmers.