This Series paper supports SDG 3 by describing several measures of health system quality, which are potential drivers of confidence, including quality of the health system and primary care, government responsiveness to public input, and COVID-19 management; the authors also discuss the policy and research implications.
This Series paper supports SDGs 3 and 10 by describing health-care coverage and quality across the four countries, quantifying inequalities in these outcomes by socioeconomic status within country, and assessing the contribution of government, social security, and private health sectors to observed inequality.
This Series paper supports SDG 3 by providing an overview of the current state of health insurance in some African and Asian countries, focusing on how coverage varies across and within countries, and the association between insurance status and use of key preventive health-care services and health system competence.
This Series paper supports SDG 3 by documenting the nature of user interactions with primary care in a large, 14-country sample; the authors find significant diversity in how citizens access usual care within and across countries.
This Personal View supprts SDGs 3 and 10 by discussing the multifaceted approach and the various stakeholder involvement needed for the expansion of access to new antibiotics while balancing with the prevention of excessive use
Although patient-centered care does not always entail meeting all of the patients' expectations, the mere understanding of their preferences in decision-making can lead to complete patient satisfaction.
The researchers examined the use of footwear that incorporates force-sensing resistor sensors to classify lower limb disorders affecting the knee, hip, and ankle joints. The outcomes of the study reveal promising findings for future gait analysis and injury diagnosis, and the potential of force-sensing resistors (FSRs) and machine learning techniques for improving the assessment of lower limb injuries, and thereby furthering SDG3.
This study indicates that among people with higher levels of disability, engaging in physical activity is linked to more effective stress coping through enhanced self-efficacy. However, this effect was not observed among people with low levels of disability.
The authors put forward a mathematical model for examining the impact of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services on reducing the transmission of waterborne diseases such as enteric diarrheal disease (EDD). It is found that wastewater and sewage treatment (WST) control has the most significant impact in terms of WASH interventions employed. The findings have could have very important public health potential and tie in strongly with the goals of SDG 6.
This study supports SDGs 3, 6, and 14 by highlighting the importance of freshwater biodiversity for human and planetary health, and suggesting that local and regional efforts for monitoring and improving ecosystem health are essential for reversing the current crisis in this area.

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