Legal practical guidance

LexisNexis Legal & Professional,

LexisNexis UK, LexisPSL, Environment, 1 September 2021

Heightened emphasis on transparency and accountability through corporate governance and disclosure has renewed the focus on the ‘triple bottom line’—environmental, social and economic impacts. Environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) reporting generally measures the sustainability and ethical performance of a company. There is increasing interest in the ESG performance of companies by various stakeholders. A range of mechanisms exist to shape CSR and foment voluntary reporting by companies on their ESG performance. Adhering to one such framework heightens credibility, and a proactive approach to sustainability presents opportunities while ensuring a company’s preparedness to embrace evolving legal requirements.
LexisNexis Legal & Professional,

LexisNexis UK, LexisPSL, Environment, 1 September 2021

UK mechanisms touching on sustainable development are generally based on, and have as their over-arching objective, some variation of the so-called “Brundtland definition”. These mechanisms also widely reference the three interconnected ‘pillars’ of sustainable development, also known as the ‘triple bottom line’ of sustainable development. The UK approach has a bearing on all SDGs and in particular, SDGs 9, 10 and 13.
LexisNexis Legal & Professional,

LexisNexis UK, LexisPSL, Environment, 1 August 2021

The Consolidated Versions of the Treaty on European Union and the Treaty on the Functioning of the Eu-ropean Union (the EU Treaties) set out the constitutional framework for the EU. The Treaties do not attempt to define sustainable development or impose an EU-wide adoption of a common definition. This practice note sets out the approach to sustainable development at the EU institutional level. This has an impact on all SDGs but in particular, SDGs 9, 10 and 13.
LexisNexis Legal & Professional,

LexisNexis UK, LexisPSL, Environment, 15 July 2021

Private and public sector organisations are increasingly required to report on their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The UK approach has a bearing on SDG 13.
LexisNexis Legal & Professional,

LexisNexis UK, LexisPSL, Environment, 15 July 2021

The 2030 Climate and Energy Framework set three key targets for the year 2030 on greenhouse gas emissions reduction, renewable energy share and energy efficiency.
LexisNexis Legal & Professional,

LexisNexis UK, LexisPSL, Environment, 1 July 2021

This Practice Note covers the main pillars of access to justice in environmental matters in the UK under the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-Making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters (Aarhus Convention). Access to justice and the ability to effectively challenge environmental decisions are key to SDG 16.
LexisNexis Legal & Professional,

LexisNexis UK, LexisPSL, Environment, 1 June 2021

The marine protected areas network in England and Wales provides designated protection for the marine environment and stems from various legislative sources. The UK approach has a bearing on SDG 14.
Stop harrasment #metoo
XpertHR,

May 2018

As employers continue to deal with the fallout of the #MeToo movement, the importance of effective sexual harassment training has become more clear. Having a workplace that is free of sexual harassment supports SDGs 5, 8 and 10. This article provides advice on why effective sexual harassment training is needed now more than ever, and best practices that apply no matter where you are.
XpertHR,

June 11, 2018

Despite the fact that getting a job with a living wage decreases the risk that an individual will commit another crime, society places many barriers to people with criminal records re-entering the workforce. SDGs 8 and 10 includes bringing the formerly incarcerated back as contributing members of society by providing meaningful work. SDG 5 also is impacted, as bias against women with criminal histories is greater than against men. A new study reveals that misconceptions that prevent employers from considering job applicants with criminal histories are not supported by the data; these workers prove to be as good or a better “quality of hire” than employees without a criminal record.

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