Supporting goal 10 (reduced inequalities), goal 8 (decent work and economic growth) and goal 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions) this blog discusses the fight for social justice and the links with inclusion and decent work for migrants in a global economy.
World Efficiency Solutions (WES) is the premier international meeting for the low-carbon and resource-efficient economy focussed on creating the low-carbon and resource-efficient market place. WES was first held in 2015 in Paris during COP21 negotiations, focusing on climate change solutions. World Efficiency develops a new environment consensus: economic and human activities must, to be sustainable, be redesigned to limit their impact on the environment while awareness of the planetary limits (climate change and resources scarcity) becomes widespread. A key objective for WES 2017 is to Identify new market opportunities aligned to the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (estimated market opportunities are larger than USD 12 trillion) and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change from 2015.
Elsevier,

Information and Organization, Volume 27, Issue 4, December 2017, Pages 211-225

Nominated for the Elsevier Atlas Award in March 2018, this article explores how increased awareness of enabling IT can impact the disability stereotypes of managers. Specifically, it contributes to goals 8 and 10 by addressing the following questions: (1) how does increased awareness of enabling IT and the capabilities it can afford impact the stereotypical beliefs of managers toward workers with disabilities? And (2) does a better-informed stereotype increase the likelihood of their workplace inclusion?
To advance goals 3 and 8, this article explores the causality between mental illness and long-term sickness absence. In a randomized clinical trial, a 4-h training programme for managers reduced sickness absence among employees in the Australian fire and rescue service at 6 months after the intervention. The training was highly cost effective and should be tested in other populations.
Anti Slavery Day
Modern slavery risks have risen across the world over the last year, including in 20 of the 28 member states of the EU. On Anti-Slavery Day, this blog looks at the increased risks and numbers of victims of forced labour in supply chains, and how to mitigate these risks contributing to goal 8 (decent work and economic growth).
The global electronics industry is one of the largest industrial sectors in the global economy, generating more revenue than any other goods-producing sector. This report examines the supply chain risks of forced labour across the industry, and manufacturing and mining in two key countries: Malaysia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It includes an analysis of top electronics brands. This report highlights the challenges in advancing target SDG 8.7 to take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking.
A new criminal corporate offence of failing to prevent facilitation of tax evasion comes into effect on 30 September 2017 in the UK. This development supports SDG 8 Decent work and economic growth and SDG 16 Peace, justice and strong institutions.
Large employers in the UK with a financial year running from April to March should be gearing up to publish their second annual modern slavery statement by the end of September 2017. Modern slavery statements support SDG 8.7 to take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking.
Demise of correspondent banking relationships - SDG Resource Centre
Correspondent banking is the cornerstone of the global payment system, designed to serve the settlement of financial transactions across country borders. It allows companies and individuals to safely move money around the world and supports and encourages global trade. Since the financial crisis, tighter regulations - and in particular the regulatory penalties imposed for violations of anti-money laundering (AML) – have caused western banks to rethink their global strategy. The risks of doing business in many developing nations are beginning to be seen as outweighing the financial benefits brought by correspondent banking activity. As a result, US and European banks have reduced their correspondent banking activity in the riskiest regions.
SDG Business Forum
In July the 2017 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) Business Forum recognised the critical role of business in delivering on the promise of sustainable and inclusive development. In this article, we elaborate on the SDG business case, and how businesses can engage with the SDG framework; driving business growth and productivity, whilst contributing to the better world envisaged by the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Pages