National Sustainable Development Strategies (NSDS)

Directly contributing to SDGs 7 (affordable and clean energy), 12 (responsible consumption and production) and 13 (climate action), this Elsevier Atlas Award winning article analyses the feasibility of powering the Americas with renewable energy by 2030.
The SDG National Reporting Initiative was launched to facilitate greater information-sharing on SDG reporting between international, regional, and local communities, furthering SDGs 16 and 17. This report summarises the state of SDG reporting as well as challenges and successes identified during the implementation of the SDG National Reporting Initiative.
Contributing to SDGs 1 and 8, this report discusses how the adoption of pro-growth policies tends to result in lower levels of poverty, especially through opportunities for job creation. In particular, it calls for policies that promote greater access to credit and the protection of minority investors in order to reduce such levels of poverty. 
This guide explores the role of corporate finance and investments in scaling finance for the SDGs, including how FDI, financial intermediation and public-private partnerships can be a source of finance for less liquid SDG investments that cannot be invested directly by portfolio or institutional investors. This includes providing access to finance in countries with less developed financial markets or for SDG solutions that are too small or illiquid to attract portfolio investors. The report contributes to SDGs 8, 16 and 17.
Elsevier,

Construction and Building Materials, Volume 161, 10 February 2018, Pages 63-69.

This Elsevier Atlas Award winning research explores a potential solution to India's sand shortage and concrete demands. Directly contributing to SDGs 9 (industry, innovation and infrastructure) and 11 (sustainable cities and communities), this research identifies recycled plastic as a viable partial replacement for sand within concrete production.
Addressing SDG 7, this chapter discusses the need to integrate the various renewable energy technologies to meet the ever-increasing demand for energy in West Africa. At the same time it makes connections with SDG 9.
Ecological infrastructure (EI) refers to ecosystems that deliver services to society, functioning as a nature-based equivalent of, or complement to, built infrastructure. EI is critical for socio-economic development, supporting a suite of development imperatives at local, national and international scales. This paper presents the myriad of ways that EI supports sustainable development, using South Africa and the South African National Development Plan as a case study, linking to the Sustainable Development Goals on a global level. We show the need for EI across numerous development and sustainability issues, including food security, water provision, and poverty alleviation contributing to several SDGs not least, goals 1, 11 and 17.
SDG 17 is concerned with official development assistance and partnerships for the goals. This paper examines the tension that arises between foreign aid agencies delivering on their altruistic commitments whilst at the same time serving the national interests of donor governments.
This overview provides guidance on the concepts of sustainability and corporate responsibility as understood under UK law, including the institutional framework for sustainable development. This guidance is relevant to all SDGs and in particular to SDGs 9, 11, and 12.
UK mechanisms touching on sustainable development are generally based on, and have as their over-arching objective, some variation of the so-called “Brundtland definition”. These mechanisms also widely reference the three interconnected ‘pillars’ of sustainable development, also known as the ‘triple bottom line’ of sustainable development. The UK approach has a bearing on all SDGs and in particular, SDGs 9, 10 and 13.

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