Institutional Frameworks and international cooperation for Sustainable Development

LexisNexis Legal & Professional,

LexisNexis UK, LexisPSL, Risk and Compliance, May 16th, 2022

This Practice Note from LexisPSL explains what the UN Global Compact is and how it interacts with issues relating to business and human rights. It also summarises the key pledges and principles of the UN Global Compact, the UN Sustainable Development Goals, how organisations can sign up and the annual reporting requirements. The UN Global Compact is a vital vehicle for advancing SDG 17.16 to enhance the global partnership for sustainable development.
In this episode of the “World We Want” podcast series, RELX’s Global Head of Corporate Responsibility, Dr. Márcia Balisciano, talks to Ruzanna Tarverdyan about how we measure progress of the Sustainable Development Goals.
Hand holding paper globe cutout
ISO 26000 provides social responsibility guidance to organisations around the world to assist them in contributing to global sustainable development. ISO 26000 contributes to every one of the 17 SDGs but is particularly influential to SDG 8, Decent Work and Economic Growth.
Elsevier,

Measuring Sustainable Development Goals Performance, 2022, Pages 139-219

This chapter advances SDGs by explaining how the economist takes part in bridging the gap between science and policy.
Objectives: To evaluate the effects of the COVID-19 lockdown on the self-reported perception of physical and mental health, in a cohort of teenagers. To assess the extent to which these effects are perceived as detrimental. Non-directional Hypothesis - the perception of physical and mental health will change over the duration of the eight weeks, due to the effects of the lockdown, as a result of COVID-19.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volume 50, Pages A1-A8, 1-318 (June 2021)

This special issue of Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability (COSUST) brings together a collection of articles on environmental sustainability in relation to those adverse climate impacts –slow onset events--which unfold gradually over time. The special issue helps identify the gaps and challenges in understanding slow onset events and their local, national, and regional impacts, and possible approaches to manage these.
UK mechanisms touching on sustainable development are generally based on, and have as their over-arching objective, some variation of the so-called “Brundtland definition”. These mechanisms also widely reference the three interconnected ‘pillars’ of sustainable development, also known as the ‘triple bottom line’ of sustainable development. The UK approach has a bearing on all SDGs and in particular, SDGs 9, 10 and 13.
Heightened emphasis on transparency and accountability through corporate governance and disclosure has renewed the focus on the ‘triple bottom line’—environmental, social and economic impacts. Environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) reporting generally measures the sustainability and ethical performance of a company. There is increasing interest in the ESG performance of companies by various stakeholders. A range of mechanisms exist to shape CSR and foment voluntary reporting by companies on their ESG performance. Adhering to one such framework heightens credibility, and a proactive approach to sustainability presents opportunities while ensuring a company’s preparedness to embrace evolving legal requirements.
The Consolidated Versions of the Treaty on European Union and the Treaty on the Functioning of the Eu-ropean Union (the EU Treaties) set out the constitutional framework for the EU. The Treaties do not attempt to define sustainable development or impose an EU-wide adoption of a common definition. This practice note sets out the approach to sustainable development at the EU institutional level. This has an impact on all SDGs but in particular, SDGs 9, 10 and 13.
This Practice Note covers the main pillars of access to justice in environmental matters in the UK under the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-Making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters (Aarhus Convention). Access to justice and the ability to effectively challenge environmental decisions are key to SDG 16.

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