Global

World Mental Health Day was observed for the first time on 10 October 1992. The day, officially commemorated every year on October 10th, aims to raise awareness in the global community about the critical mental health agendas – with a unifying voice through collaboration with various partners – to take action and to create lasting change. It was started as an annual activity of the World Federation for Mental Health by the then Deputy Secretary-General Richard Hunter. In 1994, at the suggestion of then Secretary-General Eugene Brody, a theme for the Day was used for the first time.

Future sustainable food systems should more efficiently use natural resources and reduce food waste. Upcycled food – foods elevated in value through ingredients otherwise wasted or previously thought inedible – constitutes a new approach contributing to this much needed transition. Successful market launches of such foods requires favourable consumer perception of these products, knowing the factors determining acceptance, and an adequate communicational framing of the new concept.

An estimated 50 million people around the world currently live with Alzheimer's disease or other dementias, dementia being a collective term for progressive syndromes that affect various expressions of cognitive function, such as memory and emotional expression. Alzheimer’s disease accounts for the majority of cases (50 to 70%, varying by country, based on Alzheimer’s Disease International and World Health Organization figures).

Elsevier,

Schizophrenia Research: Cognition, Volume 29, September 2022, article 100249

A discussion of progress in treating sognitive impairment for those with schizophrenia.
Elsevier,

Schizophrenia Research: Cognition, Volume 28, June 2022, article 100239/

A trial to try to diagnose children more likely to develop schizophrenia.
Elsevier,

Schizophrenia Research: Cognition, Volume 28, June 2022, article 100247

Ways to improve cognitive impairment caused by psychosis.
Elsevier,

Environment International, Volume 158, January 2022, article 106984

Research on the impacts of climate change on mental health and mental health-related systems will assist decision-makers to develop robust evidence-based mitigation and adaptation policies and plans with the potential for broad benefits to society and the environment.
Elsevier,

One Earth, Volume 2, Issue 6, June 2020, Pages 497-499.

Article showing the relation between Good Health (SDG 3) and Climate Change (SDG 13).
The menopausal transition is often accompanied by psycho-vegetative symptoms, including stress and anxiety symptoms. Several psychological interventions are available for stress reduction.
Additional sources of information to self-reports are needed for the detection of disabling mental and musculoskeletal disorders prior to older age.

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