World Water Day 2022

World Water Day is on 22 March every year. It is an annual United Nations Observance, started in 1993, that celebrates water and raises awareness of the 2 billion people currently living without access to safe water. A core focus of World Water Day is to inspire action towards Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6: water and sanitation for all by 2030.

This year’s theme is ‘groundwater’ and draws attention to the hidden water resource that has always been critically important but not fully recognized in sustainable development policymaking. Groundwater is invisible, but its impact is visible everywhere. Out of sight, under our feet, groundwater is a hidden treasure that enriches our lives. Almost all of the liquid freshwater in the world is groundwater. As climate change gets worse, groundwater will become more and more critical.  We need to work together to sustainably manage this precious resource. Groundwater may be out of sight, but it must not be out of mind. 

To raise awareness on sustaining groundwater, Elsevier presents a curated list of publicly available journal articles and book chapters. At Elsevier, we are advancing #SDG6 research and ensuring that #groundwater is sustainably explored, analyzed, and monitored.

Elsevier,

Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Volume 79, February 2022

This article contributes to research on public policy and water sanitation.
Elsevier,

One Earth, Volume 4, 19 February 2021

A framework for understanding water's many functions for supporting, regulating, and stabilizing hydro-climatic, hydro-ecological, and hydro-social systems.
Elsevier,

International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, Volume 30, September 2018

Considering the area of Lecce province (Salento peninsula, Apulia region, Southern Italy), this study outlines the non-linear cascading paths related to groundwater depletion and salinization in an urbanized coastal region depending quite entirely on groundwater resources of a coastal karst aquifer.
Elsevier,

iScience, Volume 24, 20 August 2021

This time series study on water quality in chalk rivers demonstrates superstatistical behaviours of environmental and anthropogenic parameters.
Figure showing the four main atmospheric water harvesting processes
Elsevier,

iScience, Volume 24, 19 November 2021

Producing clean, fresh drinking water from atmospheric water vapor can play an important role in alleviating water scarcity in drought-prone regions of the world. This perspective explores the current trends and future outlook for atmospheric water harvesting technologies.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Global Health, Volume 9, December 2021

This study supports SDGs 3 and 6 by showing that a handwashing intervention involving disgust-inducing messages, combined with the provision of handwashing stations in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, successfully increased rates of handwashing with soap after toilet use. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of combining health-based messaging with non-health-based messaging when implementing water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions.
Figure showing the proportions of the global population under water stress per month in 2010
Elsevier,

The Lancet Planetary Health, Volume 5, November 2021

This Article supports SDGs 3 and 6 by assessing global human water stress for low to high environmental flow protection. The findings suggest that ensuring high ecological protection would put nearly half the world's population under water stress for at least 1 month per year, meaning important trade-offs are made when allocating limited water resources between direct human needs and the environment.
Elsevier,

iScience, Volume 24, 19 November 2021

An interdisciplinary team of researchers and citizen scientists team up for assessing water quality in an iconic English river.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Global Health, Volume 7, January 2019

This study supports SDGs 3 and 6 by showing that elementary WASH interventions alone were insufficient in reducing the prevalence of stunting, anaemia, and diarrhoea in children in rural Zimbabwe; these findings call for greater investment into, and scale-up of, WASH programmes in rural settings, in order to achieve more meaningful improvements in child health outcomes.

Pages