Water and sanitation

Pollutec 2018 logo
POLLUTEC is a world leading exhibition of environmental equipment technologies and services, the first ever event to focus on environment as a professional sector and has been at the heart of environment innovation since 1978. Pollutec provides a critical platform for the environment and climate change, bringing together environment professionals and technologists from across the world in Lyon. Pollutec’s major fields are: Water; Waste Management and Recycling; Instrumentation, Metrology, Automation; Risks Management (industrial & environmental); Air Quality; Sites and Soils Management (and Recovery); Energy (and sub-sectors such as biogas, renewables and energy efficiency) which are directly related to SDGs: 6,7,9,11,12,13,14,15
Elsevier,

Water Reclamation and Sustainability, Chapter 1, 2014, Pages 1–18

This chapter addresses SDG targets 6.1, 6.3 and 6.4 through its discussion of monitoring water quality and water reclamation to achieve sustainability.
Girl drinking water
Contributes to Goal 6. The RELX ​Group ​Environmental ​Challenge 2018 ​is now open for applications, awarding projects that best demonstrate how they can provide sustainable access to safe water or sanitation. There is a $50,000 prize for the first place entry and a $25,000 prize for the second place entry.
Elsevier,

Ecohydrology & Hydrobiology, 2018, ISSN 1642-3593, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecohyd.2018.02.002.

Picture showing different livelihoods in the wetland studied
Ensuring conservation, restoration and sustainable use of wetlands is a target under goal 15 (life on land). This paper studies the major ecological states and identifies the main ecosystem services (ESs), along with local people's perceptions of wetland management in the Ethiopian wetlands.
The International Water Summit (IWS) is a global platform for promoting water sustainability in arid regions by bringing together world leaders, field experts, academics and business innovators to accelerate the development of new sustainable strategies and technologies. Videos from the 2017 summit cover a wide range of technologies and innovations which support SDG 6 Clean Water and Sanitation and SDG 11 Sustainable Cities and Communities.
River dredging in progress
Water management - and ensuring an adequate supply for everyone - is one of the biggest challenges being faced by the UK. In a move by the Environment Agency, internal drainage boards could be given a bigger role in making that happen, helping to reducing flood risks to farmland and local villages in the process. This helps meet SDG 6, Clean Water and Sanitation.
An early warning scheme is proposed that runs ensembles of inferential models for predicting the cyanobacterial population dynamics and cyanotoxin concentrations in drinking water reservoirs. When the 10- to 30-day-ahead predicted concentrations of cyanobacteria cells or cyanotoxins exceed pre-defined limit values, an early warning automatically activates an action plan considering in-lake control. Implementing the proposed scheme for drinking water reservoirs enhances current water quality monitoring practices by solely utilising in situ monitoring data, in addition to cyanobacteria and cyanotoxin measurements. Access to routinely measured cyanotoxin data allows for development of models that predict explicitly cyanotoxin concentrations that avoid to inadvertently model and predict non-toxic cyanobacterial strains.
This paper presents an intersectional analysis of the gender-water-tourism nexus. Based in an emergent tourism destination, Labuan Bajo, Indonesia, it goes beyond an analysis of how women bear the brunt of burdens related to water scarcity, and examines which women, why and how it affects their daily lives. This relates to SDG 5 Gender equality and SDG 6 clean water and sanitation.
Living in a harsh, desert climate, Omani rural communities have developed locally-appropriate knowledge to deal with water scarcity. The aflaj taps into the natural water table and uses a gravity system to channel water through underground channels to villages. Traditional techniques of water management, represents a way of adapting to and coping with difficult climates but modernisation harms these traditional systems. This review finds ways for the aflaj system to respond to pressures of modernity and adapt to a multiple institutional framework to ‘transform’ collective water management, contributing to SDG 6.
Elsevier,

Science Bulletin, Volume 62, Issue 2, 30 January 2017, Pages 83-91

Traditional nutrient recycling systems in China have been recognized as a good model for long-term sustainability. Nevertheless, the traditional philosophy has not been well inherited in modern society, and the consequences of environmental degradation from the changed nutrient management systems have not been well recognized by the public. If the additional nutrient sources in future urbanization cannot be well recycled, people will face more challenging environmental problems. The analysis of the environmental and economic costs from wastewater treatment systems indicates that the road for nutrient management after the 1980s was not the right choice. China should re-evaluate the value of the traditional philosophy and develop new technologies to meet modern socioeconomic requirements. These insights support many of the targets to advance SDG 11 Sustainable cities and communities.

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