End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

The community-based MLMC intervention described in this paper had significant impacts on individual intake of dietary fat and carbohydrates. These dietary behaviors are important key factors related to chronic disease risk and further implementation of MLMC interventions could go someway way to improve dietary intake among Native American populations post-colonization.
The authors of this paper developed and tested a culturally appropriate food picture-sort frequency tool that is feasible and acceptable to both Navajo children and adults. This tool and its indices have the potential to measure the change for school-based intervention studies among the Navajo Nation because of its cultural appropriateness, ease of administration and low burden, and the convergent validity and reliability of its indices.
This paper concludes that In the participating Dene population, vitamin D, fiber, and calcium intake were low, resulting in deficiencies for the majority of the participants and that Poor nutritional status might be because of several complex and intersecting challenges experienced by northern Indigenous communities, such as the historical context of colonialism, remote food insecurity, and social and environmental inequities. It is suggested that nutrition education, financial interventions, and store-food pricing policies should be put in place to facilitate access to market food, and culturally adequate initiatives, such as community harvest programs, should be put in place to facilitate better access to TFs/CFs.
The research in this paper shows that all 4 WEPs (Wild Edible Plants) frequently consumed by the Semai have variable quantities of proximate composition and mineral composition .According to the study’s findings, these wild plants can be regarded as inexpensive and good sources of micronutrients necessary for health and well-being. They can also contribute substantially to dietary needs, especially in remote areas, because of their beneficial nutritional qualities.
Nutrition research benefits from broad and intensive participation by stakeholders. The articles in this special issue demonstrate that understanding participation is complex because it incorporates the dimensions of stakeholders, activity, time, and intensity. Early involvement in research can help prioritize the problems to be addressed, refine the specific research question, and determine acceptable community-based approaches to be used in an intervention. The included papers provide insight into how to define and measure participation, how to explore approaches to encourage participation of direct and indirect beneficiaries, and how participation at different time points and by different stakeholders can validate and support interventions and enhance effectiveness.
The authors of this paper conclude that training food service staff and other food service staff may be beneficial to improve meal quality in the Early Care and Education (ECE) programs but point out that positive changes did not last, perhaps indicating a need for longer and rigorous trainings.
Elsevier,

Stanislaw Sieniutycz, Chapter 6 - Biodiversity maintenance in food webs, Editor(s): Stanislaw Sieniutycz, Complexity and Complex Ecological Systems, Elsevier, 2023, Pages 75-97, ISBN 9780443192371

This content aligns with Goal 15: Life on Land by introducing the subject of trophic relationships in coastal and estuarine ecosystems.
Elsevier,

Nikolay Manchev Petrov, Mariya Ivanova Stoyanova, Rajarshi Kumar Gaur, Chapter 12 - Biodiversity and characterization of economically important viruses on potato cultivars, Editor(s): Rajarshi Kumar Gaur, Basavaprabhu L. Patil, Ramasamy Selvarajan, Plant RNA Viruses, Academic Press, 2023, Pages 245-270, ISBN 9780323953399

This content aligns with Goal 15: Life on Earth as it discusses the different viruses that can infect potatoes which are a problem for the quality and the quantity of global potato production which can exacerbate any food security issues.
This article supports SDG 2, SDG 3 and SDG 13 by demonstrating the importance of enhancing farmers’ perceptions of of Climate-Smart Agriculture potential to promote environmental stewardship with motivations by demographic, socioeconomic and ecological factors.
This study contributes to Goal 2 - Zero Hunger beacuse it shows that gradual increases in CO2 will decrease the amount of calories supplied by starch in rice-based diets, therefore potentially having an impact causing hunger all over the world if further increases in CO2 in the frame of climate change are not prevented.

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