Food security and nutrition and sustainable agriculture

Household methodologies (HHM) intervene directly in intra-household gender relations to strengthen overall smallholder agency and efficacy as economic agents and development actors. Strengthening women's agency is one mechanism for progressing towards collaborative, systemic farm management. It is expected this will contribute to improved farm resilience in the face of climate change, strengthen food and nutrition security, and improve other development indicators related to SDGs 2 and 5.
Elsevier,

 

Journal of World Business - Volume 53, Issue 1, January 2018, Pages 75-84

Foreign Direct Investments (FDI) in land or, more critically, land grabbing have increasingly targeted developing countries with not yet clear implications for the food security of these countries. This study focuses on the investor’s country of origin and explores the interconnections between SDG 2 and SDG 12. It suggests that specific home institutional contexts can promote corporate pro-active responsible conducts helping expand the land used for crop production, and, thus, improve food security in the host developing country.
Huge amounts of food waste exist in the consumption stage in developed countries. The waste can be converted into safe, nutritious, and value-added livestock feeds. ReFeed can be a game changer, simultaneously addressing multiple challenges such as food security, resource and environmental sustainability, and climate change. This is related to SDG's 2, 12, 13 and 14.
How to feed a population of 9bn in 2050? This was the question posed which provided the impetus for Elsevier to launch the bi-annual International Conference on Global Food Security Conference in 2013. Now in its 3rd year this highly regarded, research-led conference is focusing on five core conference themes to reflect an integrated approach to identifying solutions to the complex global challenge of food security: 1. Food creation 2. Food safety and bio security 3. Food loss and waste 4. Food in a changing society 5. Food utilization. Achieving global food security whilst reconciling demands on the environment is the greatest challenge faced by mankind. This directly supports SDG 2: to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.
This paper explores the impact of mobile phones on gender equality and nutrition in Uganda. Using panel data from rural Ugandan smallholder farmers, the researchers analysed the social welfare effects of mobile phones. A positive connection is found between increasing female mobile phone use and improvement in nutrition, relating to SDG 2 and SDG 5 and where women have access to and use a mobile phone the impact was greater.
Elsevier,

Global Food Security, Volume 15, December 2017, Pages 94-107

Contributing to SDG 1 and SDG 2, this paper shows that despite progress in reducing extreme poverty, little progress has been made in reducing the number of people living on between $1.25 and $2 a day and it provides updated estimates of rural and urban poverty for regions throughout the developing world. Social protection programmes are a key way for governments to support the poor. Secondly, agricultural input subsidies are a key government tool for boosting agricultural production, especially that of smallholder farmers. This paper is one of the first to examine both social protection and agricultural input subsidies in alleviating poverty.
River dredging in progress
Water management - and ensuring an adequate supply for everyone - is one of the biggest challenges being faced by the UK. In a move by the Environment Agency, internal drainage boards could be given a bigger role in making that happen, helping to reducing flood risks to farmland and local villages in the process. This helps meet SDG 6, Clean Water and Sanitation.
Ruth Machuma Ndunde with her cow
Nearly 30 years on from its launch by a group of UK West Country dairy farmers, the charity Send a Cow is making a big difference to people’s lives in seven countries in Africa. With its new campaign under way, Farmers Weekly finds out what the charity hopes to achieve and how farmers abroad are benefiting with the help of their UK counterparts. Endeavours such as this support SDG 1 No Poverty, and SDG 2 Zero Hunger and are a great example of SDG 17 Partnerships for the goals in action.
This paper examines the trends in famine over the last 150 years, with particular attention to the fusion of famine with forcible mass starvation. It identifies four main historic periods of famines, namely: the zenith of European colonialism; the extended World War; post-colonial totalitarianism; and post-Cold War humanitarian emergencies; and asks whether we may be entering a fifth period in which famines return in new guises. The paper explores structural causes of famine vulnerability, the overlapping but distinct causes of food crises and excess mortality in those crises, and the proximate triggers of famine. While noting that almost all famines have multiple causes, with no individual factor either necessary or sufficient, the paper focuses on the growing significance of political decision and military tactics in creating famine. It is an important review of the causes related to hunger and therefore to help advance SDG 2.
Bangladesh is one of the world's most vulnerable countries to climate change. This study combines environmental and human elements to assess socio-environmental outcomes. It examines the implications of climate change on poor communities dependent on fishing for their livelihoods, exploring the interconnectedness of SDG's 1,2, 14 and how they will be impacted by SDG 13.

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