Food security and nutrition and sustainable agriculture

The chapter advances goal 2 by discussing the need for a shift in dietary patterns from animal-derived protein to plant-based protein, particularly in the more developed economies.
Elsevier,

Insects as Sustainable Food Ingredients, Production, Processing and Food Applications, 2016, Pages 1-27.

This chapter addresses goal 2 by demonstrating the feasibility and value of insects as a sustainable commodity for food, feed and other applications.
There is overwhelming evidence that the national food system in South Africa is in crisis. This chapter contributes to goals 2 and 10 by outlining some of the key interventions that are attempting to increase food equity and sustainability.
Elsevier,

Food Industry Wastes, Assessment and Recuperation of Commodities, 2013, Pages 17-36.

This chapter advances goal 12 by examining the development of green food production strategies; these take a holistic approach while applying principles of industrial ecology and maintaining the integrity of the biosphere.
This chapter explores goals 1 and 10 by examining whether the social sustainability enjoyed by sugar industry employees can be maintained given expanding beet production, falling world prices, promotion of healthy diets and the development of sugar alternatives.
A John Deere tractor pulling a direct drill through a field of stubble
Direct drilling - where the ground is not ploughed before a new crop is established - helps conserve soil moisture and structure and prevents wind erosion. Switching to direct drilling, or "no-till", can therefore bring big savings in labour and machinery costs. However does this translate to better gross margins? A benchmarking study, which compared no-till with more conventional approach, suggest there are savings to be made despite dips in yield. This supports SDG12: Responsible Consumption and Production.
Linking to Goals 2, 6, 15, 17, this toolbox connects your business to the latest tools, guidance, case studies, datasets, and more most relevant to you based on your circumstances and interests.
With increasing pressure on chemical solutions to pests and diseases from the public, and growing resistance from plants as well as the risk to bees and other beneficial insects, farmers urgently need viable alternatives. Farmers Weekly talked to a UK farmer who is relying on biological controls to keep his oilseed rape healthy and yields profitable. This helps support SDG 12 - responsible consumption and production.
Elsevier,

Geoforum, Volume 91, May 2018, Pages 73-77

This article presents an evaluation of the achieved result and points out the activities that require adjustments working towards Goal 2
A drone's eye view of a root crop planter, pulled by a tractor as it works in the field
This article explores how innovations can be used to advance goals 2 (zero hunger) and 12 (sustainable consumption and production). Nematicides - products for controlling soil-borne pests in root crops - are under threat of further regulation or withdrawal due to their toxicity. The Nematicide Stewardship Programme is demonstrating they can be used responsibly and safely to ensure their approval is maintained. But one farmer has taken it a step further by using technology to ensure his nematicide is applied accurately.

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