Oceania

Proper regulation is essential to ensure that such a system benefited those in need, and that those who provided organs are properly compensated. Without significant policy changes, however, far too many patients will continue to languish on waiting lists until they run out of time. The goal of SDG3 is that everyone should have a good health and well-being.
Human health, in the coming decades (and already in some “front-running” regions), is in peril. Although some authorities warn that over-stating such risks can induce paralysis and despair, under-stating them will not generate the intense action that is required. The impact of climate change on the Earth system is now so significant that the next ice age will likely be delayed by at least 50,000 years [201]. If humans do not rapidly change their collective behavior, then this may be their most enduring legacy. It is hoped that this chapter makes a small contribution to SDG3.
Elsevier,

Manson's Tropical Diseases (Twentyfourth Edition), 2024, Pages 11-19

With a pressing climate emergency and increasing interconnectedness, the need for action on health at a global level is greater than ever. Achieving Universal Health Coverage with a strong base in primary healthcare is essential. This must be accompanied by policies to address the socioeconomic and environmental determinants of ill health, supporting SDG3.
Elsevier,

Artificial Intelligence in Clinical Practice, How AI Technologies Impact Medical Research and Clinics

2024, Pages 395-399

To harness the power and promise of AI in global health, adequate investment must be made in communication, computer systems, and supporting personnel to collect, curate, and manage the data necessary to enable benefits and minimize harm from the use of AI-related tools. In developed countries, this has either occurred or is underway. Developing countries run the risk of widening the digital divide if this does not occur. This chapter supports SDG3.
This Article supports Sustainable Development Goal 3 by calculating the proportion of dementia in Australia attributable to 11 potentially modifiable risk factors. They found that 38% of dementia was attributable to these risk factors (increasing to 41% when a 12th risk factor, traumatic brain injury, was added). The authors note that these findings could help to guide culturally specific dementia risk reduction programmes.
This Article supports SDG 3 by showing that, among suicide decedents in NSW, Australia, most had little contact with healthcare in the year before death, suggesting that suicide prevention measures could be introduced in non-healthcare settings such as schools, universities, and workplaces. The authors also note that suicide prevention strategies should also target people with worsening physical health conditions, especially those prescribed opioids, and people with serious mental health conditions who have missed appointments or reduced appointment frequency with mental health professionals.
Elsevier,

Translational Sports Medicine

Handbook for Designing and Conducting Clinical and Translational Research

2023, Pages 513-518

This chapter focuses on n the population and environmental considerations that impact how patients receive care, identify health concerns, and empower them to take initiative in their own care with the health teams surrounding their care supporting SDG 3.
Elsevier,

Principles and Application of Evidence-based Public Health Practice

2024, Pages 101-125

Public policy and linked social action must address the structural or intermediary social determinants of health. Though policy decisions or reform is one of the social action approaches, the programmatic, regulatory, and community development approaches need to be efficiently used. The COVID-19 pandemic expedited and facilitated collaboration with people outside the health sector. Such established and better-performing collaborations and social actions need continuation and expansion to other areas for better health and well-being. The national and subnational multisectoral action plan and its effective implementation can facilitate the “Health in All Policies” and address most of the social determinants of health.
To ensure sustainability, vertical or disease-specific programs or projects (government funded or external funded) should not develop standalone community participation interventions. They should be mandated to build on the existing social capital. The untied funds required for implementation of decentralized decision-making should be released in a timely manner without needless audit objections. Communities are not going to go anywhere. Hence, we need consistence in policy concerning community participation and patience from the administrators to implement community participation holistically with realistic sustainable short-term process indicators, while the focus is on medium- and long-term goals, including SDG3.
Ongoing attention must be paid to these psychological dimensions for migrants and refugees, as well as further research, de-stigmatization, and education of governments and other stakeholders during the Compacts' implementation, review, and follow-up period, supporting SDG3.

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