Gender equality and women's empowerment

Advancing SDGs 3, 5 and 16, this article discusses increased risk of family violence during COVID-19 pandemic and suggests that collaborations between human welfare and animal welfare agencies, expanding community partnerships, and informing the public of the great importance of reporting any concerns of abuse are all critical at this time.
Violence against women and girls is one of the most widespread violations of human rights. Global estimates published by WHO indicate that about 1 in 3 (35%) of women worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence in their lifetime. Since 1981, Women's rights activists have observed November 25th as a day against gender-based violence. To mark this event, Elsevier presents a curated, open access collection of 52 journal articles and book chapters to highlight to the urgent need to end violence against women and girls.
This article addresses SDGs 3 and 5 by presenting data from an interrupted time series showing the economic and psyschological impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on women and families in Rupganj upazila, a region in rural Bangladesh. Women reported greater food insecurity due to reduced family income, an increase in symptoms of depression and anxiety, and an increase in intimate partner violence during the lockdown, ranging from emotional violence (threats, humiliation, and insults) to moderate to severe physical violence or sexual violence.
Contributing to SDGs 3, 5 and 10, this article examines how COVID-19 lockdowns have presented substantial risks to the wellbeing of women, particularly through economic inequality and exposure to intimate partner violence.
In this article, a multifocal analytical strategy based on an intersectional gender-sensitive approach was used to analyse the evidence coming from both forensic case studies and contextual studies about sexual interrelation and drug use. The paper contributes to SDGs 5, 9, and 16.
Ruth Bader Ginsburg championed gender equality throughout her life. Find out more about how she advanced SDG 5.
Contributing to SDGs 5 and 16, this study reviewed forensic records of sexual assault examinations carried out in different Italian health facilities and correlated these findings with the results of the forensic DNA analyses.
Elsevier,

Women's Studies International Forum, Volume 82, September–October 2020, 102402

To better understand how gender impacts parliamentary representation, the authors analysed representative claims made by parliamentarians in India, the world's largest democracy. Applying critical frame analysis to plenary debates in the Indian Rajya Sabha, the paper examined four parliamentary bills addressing violence against women and children under four successive governments between 1999 and 2019, contributing to SDGs 5 and 16.
International advocacy and evidence have been critical for shifting the pervasive issue of violence against women onto the health agenda. Guidelines and training packages, however, can be underpinned by Western principles of responding to individual survivors of violence and availability of specialist referral services, which may not be available in many countries. As Timor-Leste and other nations begin to build their health system response to violence against women, it is important to understand the current practices of health providers and the broader sociocultural context of providing care to survivors of violence. This article contributes to SDGs 3 and 5.
Efforts to provide a normed standard for what constitutes intimate partner violence, child abuse, and neglect have clashed with attempts to recognize the impact of cultural variability on the experiences of family maltreatment. Contributing to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter takes on this challenging intersection by answering vital questions about the operationalization of intimate partner violence and child maltreatment, including how to integrate the need for universal standards with considerations of cultural context.

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