Gender equality and women's empowerment

Contributing to goal 5 (gender equality), these authors take a critical look at current efforts to measure women’s empowerment at the individual/household level through standardized tools. They confirm that agency alone does not adequately reflect local meanings of empowerment.
The deadline for employers to report their gender pay gaps passed at midnight on 4 April. At that point, 10,016 organisations had uploaded their data to the government's gender pay gap reporting website.
Sex discrimination blog picture
The goal of SDG 5 is to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls. The issue of sexual harassment is now at the forefront thanks to the #metoo movement and the countless women coming forward with stories of facing harassment and inappropriate conduct at work. As a result, organizations are starting to change their policies and practices with a renewed awareness and emphasis on training.
In de Souza E Souza v Primark Stores Ltd, the employment tribunal awarded £47,433 to a transgender employee who suffered harassment and recommended that the employer adopt a written policy on how to deal with new and existing staff who are transgender or who wish to undergo gender reassignment. This advances goal 8 (decent work and economic growth), goal 10 (reduced inequalities) and goal 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions).
In Guisado v Bankia SA and others, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) held that there is nothing in EU law to prevent a pregnant worker from being included in collective redundancies. This sets out legal implications for pregnant workers and aligns with goal 5.
Supporting goal 10 (reduced inequalities), goal 8 (decent work and economic growth) and goal 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions) this blog discusses the fight for social justice and the links with inclusion and decent work for migrants in a global economy.
Household methodologies (HHM) intervene directly in intra-household gender relations to strengthen overall smallholder agency and efficacy as economic agents and development actors. Strengthening women's agency is one mechanism for progressing towards collaborative, systemic farm management. It is expected this will contribute to improved farm resilience in the face of climate change, strengthen food and nutrition security, and improve other development indicators related to SDGs 2 and 5.
How to feed a population of 9bn in 2050? This was the question posed which provided the impetus for Elsevier to launch the bi-annual International Conference on Global Food Security Conference in 2013. Now in its 3rd year this highly regarded, research-led conference is focusing on five core conference themes to reflect an integrated approach to identifying solutions to the complex global challenge of food security: 1. Food creation 2. Food safety and bio security 3. Food loss and waste 4. Food in a changing society 5. Food utilization. Achieving global food security whilst reconciling demands on the environment is the greatest challenge faced by mankind. This directly supports SDG 2: to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.
This paper explores the impact of mobile phones on gender equality and nutrition in Uganda. Using panel data from rural Ugandan smallholder farmers, the researchers analysed the social welfare effects of mobile phones. A positive connection is found between increasing female mobile phone use and improvement in nutrition, relating to SDG 2 and SDG 5 and where women have access to and use a mobile phone the impact was greater.
The First 100 Years is a ground-breaking history project charting the journey of women in law since 1919. The project’s vision is to ensure a strong and equal future for all women in the legal profession through a deep understanding of the past combined with a celebration of today. It therefore supports SDG 5 with a focus on target 5 concerned with women in leadership positions. This video interview with Lady Hale, the first female President of the Supreme Court, gives a personal account of her being the ‘first’ many times over and the role of women in the legal profession.

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