Sustainable consumption and production

Elsevier,

Dincer, Exergy - Energy, Environment and Sustainable Development, 2021, Pages 61-89

This book chapter advances SDGs 7 and 9 by connecting exergy with three essential areas in terms of energy, environment and sustainable development.
Contributing to SDGs 2, 12 and 13, this article provides an overview of the sustainability motives consumers have for selecting their food.
Elsevier and the International Solar Energy Society (ISES) are pleased to announce the third biennial Renewable Transformation Challenge. If you have an innovative proposal which contributes to the goal of transitioning to 100% renewable energy, submit your application for a chance to win €20,000.
To show the importance of climate action and to celebrate the more than 5-year collaboration between the Elsevier Chemistry journals department and the Elsevier Foundation, we have compiled this special issue, highlighting top chemistry content related to SDG 13 and providing information on past winners of the Green & Sustainable Chemistry Challenge.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Green and Sustainable Chemistry, Volume 29, June 2021

Are microplastics as harmful as the general public think? What is the science behind this?
Elsevier,

Case Studies in Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Volume 3, June 2021, 100104

Contributing to SDGs 7, 12 and 13, this article explores the damaging effects of batteries used in electronic devices, with a focus on the range of contaminants which are deposited in the environment and their long-term effects.
Cultured meat is produced by culturing animal cells ex vivo rather than raising and slaughtering animals. Contributing to SDGs 2, 12 and 13, this article explores how cultured meat is a promising way to address concerns about resource consumption, environmental pollution, public healthy that associated with conventional livestock production.
Elsevier,

Trends in Food Science and Technology, Volume 111, May 2021

More 50% of harvested coffee fruit becomes waste. The use of coffee by-products in products reduces environmental impact. Coffee by-products can be used in several topical formulations.
Elsevier’s new video series features short interviews with research leaders on topical issues for universities. In these episodes, speakers discuss how universities are accelerating progress towards the UN SDGs.
Along with the demand to reduce carbon emissions, today's unused agricultural by-products from mostly crop but also livestock farming have great potential to support green African urban innovation and create new opportunities for rural businesses. This article contributes to SDGs 8, 11 and 13.

Pages