Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

The SDGs are all connected. Success in one goal often relies on success in another. The science supporting the SDGs needs to reflect these connections, which is what the Perspectives Project aims to achieve: enabling collaboration between experts from all over the world. The project addresses a core question: how is the SDG agenda influencing scholarly debates in different research areas, and vice-versa? The reviews will cover the breadth of the SDGs and will be published as part of three special issues in three key journals.
Elsevier,

World Development, Volume 101, January 2018, Pages 173-187

The Green Climate Fund (GCF) was set up in 2009 to help developing countries address climate change, however, it is confronted with the problem of insufficient financing. SDG 17 focuses on partnerships for the goals, which includes official development assistance. This paper explores several schemes for raising the public finance of the GCF among developed countries and therefore contributes to both goal 17 and 13.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Green and Sustainable Chemistry, Volume 8, 2017

From waste to wealth using green chemistry: The way to long term stability
This paper provides an overview on societal challenges and opportunities associated with waste valorization strategies, contributing to SDG 12. Moving away from the linear economy model, waste becomes a resource rather than a burden for the society. Focusing on two specific waste streams – namely plastics and food supply chain wastes – it explores a circular economy model. Bearing in mind that waste is a resource, initiatives all over the world should not only target minimizing or totally stopping land-filling but also reducing existing land-fills through landfill mining. In accordance with SDG 17, Clark suggests a three-way partnership between industry, government and the public – where each actor plays a specific role in promoting new technologies, developing supportive regulations and embracing a new consumption attitude towards waste.
Ecological infrastructure (EI) refers to ecosystems that deliver services to society, functioning as a nature-based equivalent of, or complement to, built infrastructure. EI is critical for socio-economic development, supporting a suite of development imperatives at local, national and international scales. This paper presents the myriad of ways that EI supports sustainable development, using South Africa and the South African National Development Plan as a case study, linking to the Sustainable Development Goals on a global level. We show the need for EI across numerous development and sustainability issues, including food security, water provision, and poverty alleviation contributing to several SDGs not least, goals 1, 11 and 17.
LexisNexis Legal & Professional,

 LexisNexis Australia, 8 August 2017

Justice Chandra (centre), Ana Cobona, Amelia Tukuwasa, Marie Chan, Myfanwy Wallwork
The goal of SDG 16.3, to promote the rule of law at the national and international levels and to ensure equal access to justice for all, relies to a large extent on access to the primary materials. The stability of the legal system of a State is usually assessed by the availability of its laws and their application and LexisNexis is proud to have been chosen as a partner to continue publication of the authorised Fiji Law Reports. Partnership for the goals is key to their success, as envisaged by SDG 17.
SDG 17 is concerned with official development assistance and partnerships for the goals. This paper examines the tension that arises between foreign aid agencies delivering on their altruistic commitments whilst at the same time serving the national interests of donor governments.
This article analyses the interplay between inter-State obligations to increase scientific knowledge, develop research capacity and transfer marine technology in accordance with several targets relating to Goal 14, Life below water.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volumes 26–27, June 2017, Pages 54-61

Accountability and adaptive management of recent global agreements such as the Sustainable Development Goals and Paris Climate Agreement, will in part rely on the ability to track progress toward the social and environmental targets they set. New approaches that have the potential to match the necessary scale of monitoring, with sufficient accuracy and at reasonable cost, are emerging. Iterative review and adaptation of analytical approaches and available technology will certainly be needed to continuously design ways to best track our progress with regards to addressing the SDG's.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volumes 26–27, June 2017, Pages 26-31

The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations present a novel approach to global governance where goal-setting features as a key strategy. While the SDGs hold a great potential, their collective success will depend on a number of institutional factors such as the extent to which states formalize their commitments, strengthen related global governance arrangements, translate the global ambitions into national contexts, integrate sectoral policies, and maintain flexibility in governance mechanisms.
This paper analyzes the impact of data gap in Millennium Development Goals’ (MDGs) performance indicators on actual performance success of MDGs. It underlines the need to strengthen the performance measurement system attached to the 2030 agenda for sustainable development and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In particular it is relevant to SDG 9 Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure, SDG 16 Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions and SDG 17 Partnership for the Goals.

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