Social Determinants Of Health

Objectives: To synthesize literature about teaching social justice to nursing students and identify approaches for effective teaching of social justice issues in nursing education. Design: An integrative review. Data sources: Literature was searched in CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, and OVID databases. In total, 32 articles were assessed for full-text eligibility, and 18 articles published from January 2011 until August 2021 were critically appraised and reviewed. Review methods: Articles were appraised using Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool.
The COVID-19 pandemic has shed light on the ongoing pandemic of racial injustice. In the context of these twin pandemics, emergency medicine organizations are declaring that “Racism is a Public Health Crisis.” Accordingly, we are challenging emergency clinicians to respond to this emergency and commit to being antiracist. This courageous journey begins with naming racism and continues with actions addressing the intersection of racism and social determinants of health that result in health inequities.
Background: The educational attainment of parents, particularly mothers, has been associated with lower levels of child mortality, yet there is no consensus on the magnitude of this relationship globally. We aimed to estimate the total reductions in under-5 mortality that are associated with increased maternal and paternal education, during distinct age intervals.
This Comment, written by two Black emergency room physicians, supports SDGs 3 and 10 by highlighting low vaccination rates for COVID-19 among Black Americans. The authors explain the historical context that has led to mistrust of the health-care system among many in the Black community and present COVID-19 vaccination as an opportunity to begin to make amends.
Background: The population of older adults (ie, those aged ≥55 years) in England is becoming increasingly ethnically diverse. Previous reports indicate that ethnic inequalities in health exist among older adults, but information is limited by the paucity of data from small minority ethnic groups. This study aimed to analyse inequalities in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and five determinants of health in older adults across all ethnic groups in England.
This Article supports SDGs 3 and 10 by evaluating ethnic inequalities in health among older adults (55 years or older) in England. The large, cross-sectional study includes more than a million survey respondents, and identifies wide ethnic inequalities in health-related quality of life, prevalence of long-term conditions, experiences of primary care, support from local services, and confidence in managing one's own health. Outcomes varied widely between minority ethnic groups, both in the direction and magnitude of associations.
Social determinants of health, including poverty, contribute significantly to health outcomes in the United States; however, their impact on pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes is poorly understood. We aimed to identify the association between neighborhood poverty and HCT outcomes for pediatric allogeneic HCT recipients in the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database.
In 2016, the World Health Organization declared that ‘Health is one of the most effective markers of any city's successful sustainable development’ (World Health Organisation, 2016). With estimates that around 6.7 billion people will live in cities by 2050, 21st century city planning decisions will play a critical role in achieving the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). They will determine the city structure and access to health-enhancing (or health-damaging) urban environments, and ultimately lifestyle choices that impact both individual and planetary health.

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