It is no secret to anyone living in Beirut or a similar modern city in a semi-arid tropical country in the summer that their home has become a concrete forest and an urban heat island. Old wood or stone houses and their gardens have been replaced by concrete towers and parking lots, in the name of development. The result is searing summer nights, a drastic loss of insect and avian biodiversity, and a large increase in energy usage for interior climate control. These problems are experienced in rapidly developing urban centers worldwide. Moreover, cities worldwide are struggling with waste disposal. Roof gardens can help solve both problems highlighting synergies with a number of SDGs, including 7 and 11.
Elsevier,

Science Bulletin, Volume 62, Issue 9, 15 May 2017, Pages 648-651

The Yangtze River Economic Belt contributes to over 40% of both the overall population and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in China. Recently, China plans for a further but green development in this area. However, ecological and environmental conditions of the Yangtze River Basin have already been largely threatened by human activities in the past. A group of ecologists, environmental scientists, and environmental policy/economy researchers conducted field investigations and data synthesis to identify current stressors, environmental and ecological status and challenges, and offer ecological solutions to mitigate impacts from future development. The insights from the investigations support SDG 8 Decent work and economic growth and SDG 11 Sustainabable cities and communities.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 31, 2017, Pages 12-25

Urbanization is transforming human society in many ways. Besides all the obvious benefits, it also brings negative impacts such as the well-documented urban heat island (UHI) effect and the magnified human heat stress. One way to reduce human heat stress is to increase vegetation density in urban areas, because they can provide evatranspiration and shading benefits. This study investigated the impact of various trees on urban micrometeorological conditions in both open space and high density settings, and how they regulate outdoor thermal comfort contributing to SDGs 11 and 15. This study suggests that urban trees should be planted strategically to improve human thermal comfort as an integral part of all modern urban developments.
Urban water and energy systems have essential and multiple interlinkages that should be considered when assessing the effects of efficiency and sustainability measures. A prototype Reference Resource to Service System (RRSS) framework is used to represent the urban water-energy nexus and linked impacts of measures. Indicative analysis based on example data for New York City reveals large variability in multi-resource and climate mitigation benefits. This paper relates to SDG's 6,7 and 11.
This article adds a valuable perspective to SDG 11, by arguing that the rush for land due to urban demand must be considered in the debate on sustainable cities. The authors review debates on global land rush and the new urban agenda. Using cases where the global land rush and urbanization are simultaneously intensifying in the global South, the authors identify four areas that should be prioritized in current debates.
This article looks at technology and policy strategies that a community may adopt today, and uses backcasting to assess whether they will prove helpful to reach long-term sustainability goals, in support of SDG 11. Using a computational case study of London, the city's metabolism is modeled as the set of interacting, cross-sectoral (water, food, energy, waste) flows of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), water, and energy. The paper proceeds to examine which businesses are currently marketing some of the identified key technological innovations
The article summarises research conducted in different climate zones related to green roof design that is correlated with roles of substrate in promoting plant growth. From the review, it will serve as a guideline for selection of substrate suitable for green roofs in different climates worldwide. From the recommendation made, the success of plant growth in addressing food security needs a concerted effort worldwide through development of standard guidelines related to green roof design for close comparison across the world region. The review supports SDG 11: Sustainable cities and communities, SDG 17: Partnerships for the goals and SDG 13: Climate action.
This Article extends the theory of so-called “neighbourhood effects” to explain the health of people living in slums; authors note that although densely populated neighbourhoods can promote the spread of disease, they can also amplify the benefits of interventions because beneficial effects are shared across many people. This neighbourhood effect is likely to offer increasing returns to investments to create a healthy environment and should be capitalised on to achieve SDG 3. The paper identifies how slums should be included in censuses to identify local priorities for action.
Disaster risk reduction is embedded in target 5 for SDG 11 sustainable cities and communities. Recognising that Asia-Pacific is the most disaster-prone region in the world and the devastating impact natural disasters have on people, communities and economies, Elsevier is working with partners to advance understanding of natural disaster science and encourage collaboration between researchers and disciplines.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Chemical Engineering, Volume 17, Pages 22-34, August 2017

This paper deals with carbon capture and storage. It provides an overview of the different technologies that have been trialled and the technological gaps that need to be bridged to make this a viable option in the long term and therefore working towards SDG 7 (affordable and clean energy) and SDG 13 (climate action).

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