Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Chemical Engineering, Volume 17, Pages 22-34, August 2017

This paper deals with carbon capture and storage. It provides an overview of the different technologies that have been trialled and the technological gaps that need to be bridged to make this a viable option in the long term and therefore working towards SDG 7 (affordable and clean energy) and SDG 13 (climate action).
The development of new high-efficiency magnets and/or electric traction motors using a limited amount of critical rare earths or none at all is crucial for the large-scale deployment of electric vehicles (EVs) and related applications, such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and e-bikes. This article shows that the permanent magnet synchronous-traction motor (PSM) remains the technology of choice, especially for hybrid vehicles (HEV and PHEV). Better material efficiency and a larger adoption of motors free of rare earths have the potential to reduce the pressure on rare earths supply for use in electric road transport applications. Reduced reliance on rare earths supports both SDG 9 and SDG 11.
Elsevier,

Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, Volume 20, 2016, Pages 402-406

Aquaponics is an innovative smart and sustainable production system for integrating aquaculture with hydroponic vegetable crops, that can play a crucial role in the future of environmental and socio-economic sustainability in smart cities. Aquaponics can play a key role enabling local production with short supply chains in the cities. This contributes to sustainable production addressed in SDG 12 as well as the connection to SDG 2.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society,Volume 27,2016,Pages 419-429,ISSN 2210-6707

Shortages of freshwater have become a serious issue in many regions around the world, partly due to rapid urbanisation and climate change. Sustainable city development should consider minimising water use by those people living in cities and urban areas. The purpose of this paper is to improve our understanding of water-use behaviour and to reliably predict water use, highly relevant to SDG 6 and 11.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society,Volume 27,2016,Pages 439-447,ISSN 2210-6707

The study of resilience in the face of large physical and climatic change has emerged as an important area of research. But while the physical variables under study are easily identified, the notion of resilience itself remains nebulous. This poses a special challenge to water security in cities. The tensions are resolved when resilience is conceived of as a teleological concept that relates to the desired futures of the community.This study shows an empirical way to achieve this by using narrative analysis on the case of water security. Such a teleological concept can be used to resolve tensions pointed out earlier and give practical insights, related to SDG 6 and 11.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society,Volume 27, 2016,Pages 448-456,ISSN 2210-6707

Abstract

Water reuse networks have been emerging globally for the last 50 years.

Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 467-474, ISSN 2210-6707

Water recycling schemes are a viable solution to limitations on water supply and yet public acceptance of these schemes is low. Advancing SDGs 6, 11 and 12, research was conducted in three metropolitan areas in the US to assess basic perceptions of treated wastewater occurrence and its acceptance in the public water supply. De facto reuse occurs at rates across the three cities higher than what is perceived. Roughly 25% of respondents perceive de facto reuse to occur in their home tap water. Respondents who perceived de facto reuse to occur at their tap were ten times more likely to have a high level of acceptance.
This paper uses ‘Medieval’ drought conditions from the 12th Century to simulate the implications of severe and persistent drought for the future of water resource management in metropolitan Phoenix, one of the largest and fastest growing urban areas in the southwestern USA. Anticipatory models enable long-term policy analysis for climate change. Mega-drought results in unsustainable groundwater use between 2000 and 2060. Aggressive drought management policies can produce sustainable yield. The time to manage droughts is before they occur. This relates to SDG 6, SDG 11 and SDG 13.
Polluted air was responsible in 2015 for 6·4 million deaths worldwide. Can walking or cycling in polluted cities negate the health benefits of exercise by increasing exposure to airborne pollutants? This systematic review in The Lancet Public Health by Magda Cepeda and colleagues provides a clear answer to this question: it compares exposure to carbon monoxide, black carbon, nitrogen dioxide, and fine and coarse particles between commuters using active and motorised transport. The study provides important insights to support target SDG 3.9 to substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 475-483, ISSN 2210-6707,

Models of university-utility collaboration.
Climate change, rapid urban population growth, land use change, and public concern with rates and use restrictions complicate water management in the cities of the American West. This paper explores a particular collaborative relationship between university researchers and water utilities, providing solutions to barriers that prevent such collaborations. The authors argue that developing an integrated model for university-utility collaborations is a critical area to focus on to achieve sustainable urban water management and advance the water-related SDGs.

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