This paper presents an intersectional analysis of the gender-water-tourism nexus. Based in an emergent tourism destination, Labuan Bajo, Indonesia, it goes beyond an analysis of how women bear the brunt of burdens related to water scarcity, and examines which women, why and how it affects their daily lives. This relates to SDG 5 Gender equality and SDG 6 clean water and sanitation.
Living in a harsh, desert climate, Omani rural communities have developed locally-appropriate knowledge to deal with water scarcity. The aflaj taps into the natural water table and uses a gravity system to channel water through underground channels to villages. Traditional techniques of water management, represents a way of adapting to and coping with difficult climates but modernisation harms these traditional systems. This review finds ways for the aflaj system to respond to pressures of modernity and adapt to a multiple institutional framework to ‘transform’ collective water management, contributing to SDG 6.
Elsevier,

Journal of Cleaner Production, Volume 155, Part 1, 2017, Pages 105-118, ISSN 0959-6526,

Climate change, population growth and rapidly increasing urbanisation severely threaten water quantity and quality in Sub-Saharan Africa. Treating wastewater is necessary to preserve the water bodies; reusing treated wastewater appears a viable option that could help to address future water challenges. In areas already suffering energy poverty, the main barrier to wastewater treatment is the high electricity demand of most facilities. This work aims to assess the benefits of integrating renewable energy technologies to satisfy the energy needs of a wastewater treatment facility based on a conventional activated sludge system, and also considers the case of including a membrane bioreactor so treated wastewater can be reused for irrigation.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Planetary Health, Volume 1, Issue 2, May 2017, Pages e48-e49

This brief article presents a renewed and strengthened version of Kate Raworth’s well-known Doughnut model, which describes the social and ecological boundaries to human wellbeing. The model shows twelve dimensions and their illustrative indicators are derived from internationally agreed minimum standards for human wellbeing, and it relates to nearly all of the SDGs.
Open defecation is a major global health problem. The number of open defecators in India dwarfs that of other states and most live in rural places. Attempts to end rural open defecation by targeting individuals, like social marketing or behaviour change approaches, often ignore the structural inequalities that shape rural residents’ everyday lives. Our study explores the role of remoteness in sustaining open defecation in rural India, advancing knowledge on SDG 6. We deploy the concept of remoteness as an analytical tool that can capture everyday practices of open defecation as a function of physical and social distance.
Urban water and energy systems have essential and multiple interlinkages that should be considered when assessing the effects of efficiency and sustainability measures. A prototype Reference Resource to Service System (RRSS) framework is used to represent the urban water-energy nexus and linked impacts of measures. Indicative analysis based on example data for New York City reveals large variability in multi-resource and climate mitigation benefits. This paper relates to SDG's 6,7 and 11.
This study illustrates how consumer social risk footprints can assist in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). For their social footprint, The authors select 4 indicators related to five of the UN's SDGs: gender equality (SDG 5 also 8.5 & 8.8); mother and child health (SDG 3, especially 3.1 & 3.2); governance (SDG 16, especially 16.5 & 16.6); and access to clean water (SDG 6, especially 6.1 & 6.2). The results discussed are important for the UN in developing partnerships to address the SDG's and for organisations such as the World Bank, Trade Unions and NGOs' work towards a fairer world.
The study addresses how food production can continue using reduced water whilst at the same time bring about improved health. The growing population in India will have an impact on water availability to be used in agriculture and so the study looks at dietary patterns which use less water. They find important synergies in diets with lower water use and positive health effects. This is in-line with the achievement of SDG 2, its related targets and to a further extent SDG 6.
Giving the World Access to Water - Elsevier Atlas
Despite the increased attention the sixth Sustainable Development Goal (clean water and sanitation) has brought, access to water in Sub-Saharan Africa is worse than ever: there are more people without access to water now than there were in 1990. In order to fix the problem we need to understand what’s going wrong with our current approaches. That was the aim of an Atlas Award-winning study published in Water Resources and Rural Development, by researchers at Glasgow Caledonian University in Scotland, the University of Malawi in Malawi and the University of Lusaka in Zambia. Interestingly enough, since women and school aged girls are typically tasked with water fetching, by providing water access and sanitation authors feel there is an effect on others SDG like SDG 10 (reduced inequalities), SDG 4 (quality education) and SDG 5 (gender equality)
Effective communication to citizens is of prime importance during public health crises involving water. This paper takes a sequential mixed method approach to the problem of communicating drinking water risks prevention of exposure to health risks in cities, related to SDG 6: clean water and sanitation.

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