Global

The Blueprint for Business Leadership on the SDGs aims to inspire all business — regardless of size, sector or geography — to take leading action in support of the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It illustrates how the five leadership qualities of Ambition, Collaboration, Accountability, Consistency, and Intentional can be applied to a business' strategy, business model, products, supply chain, partnerships, and operations to raise the bar and create impact at scale. The Blueprint is a tool for any business that is ready to advance its principled approach to SDG action to become a leader. This chapter relates specifically to SDG 15.
The HPCC Systems Team collaborates with multiple higher learning institutions globally to help train and develop the future managers of Big Data projects. Participating institutions receive free training classes and materials to learn the platform and help incorporate it into their curriculum. Students benefit from learning and working with a platform that was designed from the ground up by industry leader, LexisNexis. This programme advances SDG 4 Quality education and SDG 9.B to support domestic technology development, research and innovation in developing countries.
HPCC training
HPCC Systems offers free introductory online training classes for anyone wanting to learn the basics of the ECL programming language and the open source HPCC Systems platform. Included in the training are self-paced lessons, lab exercises and a moderated Q&A forum to increase proficiency for solving Big Data problems. HPCC Systems training advances SDG 4 Quality education and SDG 9.B to support domestic technology development, research and innovation in developing countries.
Consumers' purchasing behaviour is increasingly influenced by businesses' ethical behaviour. As Christmas is a time of celebration and this goes hand in hand with consumption, this article explored some of the products that are at risk of being produced by people in modern slavery.
Elsevier, Chem, Volume 1, 1 December 2016
Professor Paul T. Anastas holds the Teresa and H. John Heinz II Chair in Chemistry for the Environment at Yale University and serves as director of the Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale. He has published widely on the subject of green chemistry and has served in the administration of three US presidents. Professor Julie Zimmerman is an internationally recognized engineer whose work is focused on advancing innovations in sustainable technologies.
Dr. Jeannette García is a chemist at IBM Research–Almaden. Her research focuses on the rational design of new polymers and materials through sustainable methods and targeting recyclable materials with previously inaccessible properties. García received her PhD in chemistry at Boston College in 2012 under the guidance of Dr. Amir H. Hoveyda and worked with Dr. Jim Hedrick as a postdoctoral researcher until 2013.
Elsevier, Physics Reports, Volume 664, 9 December 2016
Historically, infectious diseases caused considerable damage to human societies, and they continue to do so today. To help reduce their impact, mathematical models of disease transmission have been studied to help understand disease dynamics and inform prevention strategies. Vaccination–one of the most important preventive measures of modern times–is of great interest both theoretically and empirically. And in contrast to traditional approaches, recent research increasingly explores the pivotal implications of individual behavior and heterogeneous contact patterns in populations.
Future climate change is usually projected by coupled earth system models under specific emission scenarios designed by integrated assessment models (IAMs), and this offline approach means there is no interaction between the coupled earth system models and the IAMs. This paper introduces a new method to design possible future emission scenarios and corresponding climate change, in which a simple economic and climate damage component is added to the coupled earth system model of Beijing Normal University (BNU-ESM).
Evidence-based cinical practice guidelines improve delivery of uniform care to patients with and at risk of developing kidney disease, thereby reducing disease burden and improving outcomes. These guidelines are not well-integrated into care delivery systems in most low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The KDIGO Controversies Conference on Implementation Strategies in LMIC reviewed the current state of knowledge in order to define a road map to improve the implementation of guideline-based kidney care in LMICs.

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