Elsevier,

Physics Reports, Volume 664, Pages 1-113, 9 December 2016

Historically, infectious diseases caused considerable damage to human societies, and they continue to do so today. To help reduce their impact, mathematical models of disease transmission have been studied to help understand disease dynamics and inform prevention strategies. Vaccination–one of the most important preventive measures of modern times–is of great interest both theoretically and empirically. Recent research increasingly explores the pivotal implications of individual behaviour and heterogeneous contact patterns in populations. The success of SDG 3 relies to a large extent on vaccination programmes.
Elsevier,

Environment International, Volume 86, January 2016, Pages 14–23

Winner of the Elsevier Atlas Award in May 2016, this paper examines the scientific evidence of the impact of climate change on human infectious diseases. Contributing to SDGs 3 and 13, the authors identify research progress and gaps on how human society may respond to, adapt to, and prepare for the related changes.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 19, December 2015, Pages 200-206

The growth in the world's population has both created and increased the size of existing mega cities. The raised temperatures of these cities, known as urban heat islands, contribute to increased pollution and health-related problems. SDG 11 aims to target urban populations - making their lives healthier and cities more sustainable. The studies of mitigation strategies in this article reveal areas of weakness in modeling designs and prediction stages to advance knowledge on SDG 11 and SDG 3.
Men are more likely than women to perpetrate nearly all types of interpersonal violence (e.g. intimate partner violence, murder, assault, rape). Drawing upon theories that explain the drivers of violence, this paper contributes to SDGs 3 and 5 by examining how gender norms, including norms and social constructions of masculinity, are at the root of most physical violence perpetration by men against women and against other men.
This paper contributes to the literature on Indigenous health, human dimensions of climate change, and place-based dimensions of health by examining the role of environment for Inuit health in the context of a changing climate. It addresses SDG 3 and 13.
Elsevier,

World Development, Volume 68, April 2015, Pages 180–204

As the post-MDG era approaches in 2016, reducing child undernutrition is gaining high priority on the international development agenda, both as a maker and marker of development. Revisiting Smith and Haddad (2000), we use data from 1970 to 2012 for 116 countries, finding that safe water access, sanitation, women’s education, gender equality, and the quantity and quality of food available in countries have been key drivers of past reductions in stunting. This article demonstrates that addressing SDGs 2, 4, 5 and 6 contributes to the advancement of SDG 3.
Elsevier,

Social Science & Medicine, March 2015, Pages 316 - 326

The evidence that large income differences have damaging health and social consequences is strong and in most countries inequality is increasing. Narrowing the gap will improve the health and wellbeing of populations and contribute to the advancement of SDG 10.2 by empowering and promoting the social, economic and political inclusion of all.
Elsevier,

Health & Place, Volume 31, January 2015, Pages 65-74

Most research on neighbourhoods and health will likely continue to be based upon observational studies, improving their design will advance knowledge generated from this growing field. Increasingly, discussions about strengthening this evidence base is being linked to other design and analytic strategies such as inclusion of instrumental variables, propensity scoring and use of natural experiments to further our understanding of the impact of place on health. We have described here several methodological issues that shaped the design considerations of the NEHW study to ensure that, while it is a cross-sectional sample, it will still advance the quality of evidence emerging from observational studies. This addresses SDG 3.
This paper extends the concept of therapeutic landscapes by investigating how green and blue spaces affect older adult health and wellbeing. Nature can promote the physical, mental, and social health of older adults. Blue space in particular embodies important therapeutic qualities for older adults. Safety, accessibility, and perception affect the therapeutic impact of landscapes. This paper addresses SDG 3.
Tenebrio molitor in the form of mealworm (left) and beetle (right). Photos by author.
This papers addresses SDGs 2 and 3 through discussions of "One Health" biosecurity by focusing on food security and documenting shortcomings of health policy based on global unity.

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