Whereas numerous studies have documented the multiple forms of physical, sexual, and psychological violence experienced by women, a thorough characterization of the abuses experienced by asylum-seeking women in the United States has not yet been undertaken. Contributing to SDGs 5 and 16, the authors' analysis of the affidavits for 85 cisgender, female asylum seekers who applied for forensic medical evaluations through a student-run asylum clinic, reveals a life-long pattern of multiple types of VAW inflicted by multiple perpetrators.
This article addresses SDGs 3 and 5 by showing that married adolescent girls in Niger experiencing intimate partner violence or reproductive coercion were more likely to use family planning without their husbands' knowledge. These findings have important implications for programmes and policies that aim to increase family planning uptake through greater engagement with male partners, as this approach could undermine the autonomy of young women.
Elsevier,

The Lancet, Volume 385, Issue 9977, 18–24 April 2015, Pages 1555-1566

This paper is part of a Lancet Series on violence against women and girls, and addresses SDGs 3 and 5 by reviewing the evidence base for a broad range of interventions aimed at reducing various forms of gender-based violence, from intimate partner violence and sexual assault to female genital mutilation and child marriage. The paper highlights the need for greater investment into violence prevention research and evaluation of programmes focusing on low-income and middle-income countries, as the majority of high-quality evidence is skewed towards high-income countries.
Elsevier,

The Lancet, Volume 385, Issue 9977, 18–24 April 2015, Pages 1567-1579

This paper is part of a Lancet Series on violence against women and girls and addresses SDGs 3 and 5 by highlighting the crucial role that health systems must play in reducing, preventing, and eliminating all forms of violence against women, as part of a multisectoral response comprising health-care providers, health policy makers and health programme planners, clinicians, and public health officials.
"Before the lockdown, the lessons were the only time of day many of the women left the house." Advancing SDGs 1, 3 and 5, this article looks at how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the women in Iraq supported by NGO Women for Women International.
The SDG Impact of COVID-19 podcast series gathers expert opinion exploring the impact of COVID-19 on the Sustainable Development Goals. In this segment, we get the view of Amanda Ellis, Executive Director of Global Partnerships for the ASU Global Futures Laboratory.
Elsevier,

Preventing Domestic Homicides: Lessons Learned from Tragedies, 2020, Pages 15-37

Linked to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter examines domestic homicides of older women through the lens of ageism.
Furthering SDGs 5 and 10, this report aims to better understand the role gender plays in the global research enterprise and inspire evidence-based policy driven by powerful data. It examines research participation, career progression and perceptions across the European Union and 15 countries globally in 26 subject areas. The report concludes that while the participation of women in research is increasing overall, inequality remains across geographies and subject areas in terms of publication outputs, citations, awarded grants and collaborations.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, Issue 3, March 2020, Page 183

 

In support of SDG 5, this reflections piece highlights the challenges of eradicating female genital mutilation (FGM) in Tanzania. Talha Khan Burki reviews the acclaimed documentary “In the Name of Your Daughter”, which focuses on the efforts of Rhobi Samwelly, a woman who runs a safe house for vulnerable girls at risk of FGM in her community and is working to change cultural attitudes towards this practice.
This article addresses SDGs 3, 4 and 5 and by analying longitudinal data from 1995 to 2012-13 on women working in academic medicine in the USA, highlighting that women reporting severe sexual harassment in the workplace were more, rather than less, likely to pursue career advancement and attain full professorship. During career advancement, increased exposure to men who abuse their position of authority, and greater resilience and awareness of these abuses following early-career experiences of sexual harassment, are speculated to be potential reasons for this observed association.

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