Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 475-483, ISSN 2210-6707,

Models of university-utility collaboration.
Climate change, rapid urban population growth, land use change, and public concern with rates and use restrictions complicate water management in the cities of the American West. This paper explores a particular collaborative relationship between university researchers and water utilities, providing solutions to barriers that prevent such collaborations. The authors argue that developing an integrated model for university-utility collaborations is a critical area to focus on to achieve sustainable urban water management and advance the water-related SDGs.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 430-438, ISSN 2210-6707,

Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) infrastructure are conventionally designed based on historical climate data. Yet, variability in rainfall intensities and patterns caused by climate change have a significant impact on the performance of an urban drainage system. Although rainwater harvesting (RWH) is a potential solution to manage stormwater in urban areas, its benefits in mitigating the climate change impacts on combined sewer networks have not been assessed yet. Hence, the goal of the present study was set to evaluate the effectiveness of RWH in alleviating the potential impacts of climate change on CSOs. This relates to SDG 6,11 and 12.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27,2016,Pages 457-466,ISSN 2210-6707,

Broad community support is required to drive progress on SDG 6 and to ensure future water security. This paper explores how social capital, measured by involvement in community organisations, might influence support for alternative water schemes. Research was conducted on a representative sample of Australian adults and highlight the importance of social capital in building engagement in water-related issues.
Elsevier,

Water Resources and Rural Development, Volume 8, November 2016, Pages 25-36.

Contributing to SDG 6 (Clean Water and Sanitation), this Elsevier Atlas Award winning article examines the social actors involved in water access and provision in Malawi and Zambia.
This article reports the most recent assessment of the global burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors and says that reductions in exposure have been key drivers of change for only a small set of environmental risks, including sanitation, household air pollution, and behavioural risks (eg, undernutrition and smoking). Understanding these risks helps to inform the achievement of SDG 3 targets.
Training and capacity building are long established critical components of global water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) policies, strategies, and programs. Expanding capacity building support for WaSH in developing countries is one of the targets of the SDG 6. There are many training evaluation methods and tools available. However, training evaluations in WaSH have been infrequent, have often not utilized these methods and tools, and have lacked rigor. The authors of this paper have developed a conceptual framework which can be used as a tool both for planning and evaluating training programs in WaSH.
Loowatt team in Madagascar
The RELX Group Environmental Challenge is awarded annually to projects that best demonstrate how they can provide sustainable access to safe water where it is presently at risk and/or access to improved sanitation. The 2016 winner was Loowatt - an innovative sanitation solution which also generates power. The Environmental Challenge directly assists SDG 6.1 and 6.2 to achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water and access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene, for all.
Elsevier,

Chem, Volume 1, Issue 1, 7 July 2016, Pages 10-12

Paul Anastas and Julie Zimmerman highlight the vital role chemistry must play in creating a sustainable future. The article provides a robust definition for green chemistry and examines the role of green chemistry in supporting the SDGs, with a particular focus on the goals addressing water, poverty and food: SDGs 1, 2, 6 and 12.
To advance Goal 6 and Goal 10, this webinar explores how businesses can responsibly manage the human rights impacts of their own water-intensive operations and/or supply chains
Membrane (bio)fouling is a major problem in separation and purification processes. This paper highlights recent advances in the design and development of highly resistant thin film composite membranes through surface modification. This is particularly relevant to SDG 6 (ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all) and the related innovations in design make this relevant for SDG 9 (build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation) as well.

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