South America

Plant-based meat substitutes are products used to replace meat in the human diet. These products have developed from traditional whole-grain meat substitutes to products based on an advanced technology called 2nd generation meat substitutes. Increased market visibility of 2nd generation products raised questions about the products´ healthiness once they are classified by NOVA as ultra-processed, are allegedly high in salt and saturated fat, and might not be nutritionally equivalent to meat.
Graphical abstract of article
Innovative food products containing new ingredients have been designed to meet nutritional needs and new consumption trends. In this way, different vegetable species, named unconventional food plants (UFPs), are being studied in the literature and are emerging as candidates to provide foods containing a better composition, providing greater healthiness. Furthermore, specific vegetable tissues discarded in post-harvest and/or industrial pre-processing operations can be considered UFPs adequate for human consumption.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Regional Health - Americas, Volume 10, 2022, 100222

This study supports SDG 3 and 10 by discussing possible determinants of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Brazilian health system through the lenses of health system resilience and geographical inequalities. The findings show that lack of proper planning to improve resilience resulted in the decrease of a quarter of the amount of health-care procedures, increasing already existing health disparities in the country and highlighting the need to allocate resources in socioeconomically vulnerable regions to reduce avoidable deaths.
This study supports SDG 3 by investigating the association between increasing the quality of primary health care in Brazil, with highly-skilled health professionals and integrated community health workers, and reductions in hospitalisations and mortality. These findings suggest that high quality, multidisciplinary primary health care remains essential to strengthening health systems in both high-income countries and in low-income and middle-income countries.
This study supports SDG 3 and 10 by analysing the association between income inequality and more than 60 outcomes of non-communicable diseases in Brazil. These findings emphasise the importance of addressing wider social determinants of health and the synergistic benefits of tackling inequalities.
Background: Road-traffic injuries are a key cause of death and disability in low-income and middle-income countries, but the effect of city characteristics on road-traffic mortality is unknown in these countries. The aim of this study was to determine associations between city-level built environment factors and road-traffic mortality in large Latin American cities. Methods: We selected cities from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Panama, and Peru; cities included in the analysis had a population of at least 100 000 people.
This article contributes to research on public policy and water sanitation.
Latin America has been particularly hard hit by the COVID-19 syndemic, including the associated economic fallout that has threatened the livelihoods of most families. Social protection platforms and policies should have a crucial role in safeguarding individual and family wellbeing; however, the response has been insufficient to address the scale of the crisis.
In low-income and middle-income countries, such as those in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America, the COVID-19 pandemic has had substantial implications for women's wellbeing. Policy responses to the COVID-19 pandemic have highlighted the gendered aspect of pandemics; however, addressing the gendered implications of the COVID-19 pandemic comprehensively and effectively requires a planetary health perspective that embraces systems thinking to inequalities.
Objectives: A limitation in the design and monitoring of public health policies is the lack of conceptual models to explain their results. The objective of this study was to develop a predictive model of stunting in children under 5 years of age in the central Andean region of Peru, using socioeconomic and agro-productive predictors. Study design: Cross-sectional data of 380 families in 15 districts of the central region of Peru. WHO criteria were used to define stunting prediction model.

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