Living in a harsh, desert climate, Omani rural communities have developed locally-appropriate knowledge to deal with water scarcity. The aflaj taps into the natural water table and uses a gravity system to channel water through underground channels to villages. Traditional techniques of water management, represents a way of adapting to and coping with difficult climates but modernisation harms these traditional systems. This review finds ways for the aflaj system to respond to pressures of modernity and adapt to a multiple institutional framework to ‘transform’ collective water management, contributing to SDG 6.
How can innovations in chemistry, energy, and biotechnology jointly be applied in low-resource settings for the benefit of a community? This LabLinks meeting combines the expertise in the applied biosciences of Trends in Biotechnology, Joule’s interest in both scientific and sustainability developments in energy, and Chem’s focus on basic chemical science with relevance to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.
2016 first prize winner of RELX Group Environmental Challenge, Loowatt, developed a waterless and energy-generating toilet system that is clean and odourless. Loowatt's patented core technology and luxury festival toilet business in the UK is helping to transform the lives of communities in Antananarivo, Madagascar's capital, through access to quality sanitation and job creation.
relx-group-environmental-challenge
The RELX Group Environmental Challenge, with a $50,000 prize for the first place entry and a $25,000 prize for the second place entry, is awarded to projects that provide sustainable access to safe water where it is presently at risk and/or access to improved sanitation. This directly assists SDG 6.1 and 6.2 to achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water and access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene, for all. Find out more about the 2017 winners.
Elsevier,

Journal of Cleaner Production, Volume 155, Part 1, 2017, Pages 105-118, ISSN 0959-6526,

Climate change, population growth and rapidly increasing urbanisation severely threaten water quantity and quality in Sub-Saharan Africa. Treating wastewater is necessary to preserve the water bodies; reusing treated wastewater appears a viable option that could help to address future water challenges. In areas already suffering energy poverty, the main barrier to wastewater treatment is the high electricity demand of most facilities. This work aims to assess the benefits of integrating renewable energy technologies to satisfy the energy needs of a wastewater treatment facility based on a conventional activated sludge system, and also considers the case of including a membrane bioreactor so treated wastewater can be reused for irrigation.
Relx Group Environmental Challenge logo
The RELX Group Environmental Challenge is awarded to projects that provide sustainable access to safe water where it is presently at risk and/or access to improved sanitation. Projects must have clear practical applicability, address identified need, and advance related issues such as health, education, or human rights. There is a $50,000 prize for the first place entry and a $25,000 prize for the second place entry. This directly assists SDG 6.1 and 6.2 to achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water and access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene, for all.
Reed Exhibitions,

International Water Summit 2017, 16-19 January 2017

The International Water Summit (IWS) is a global platform for promoting water sustainability in arid regions by bringing together world leaders, field experts, academics and business innovators to accelerate the development of new sustainable strategies and technologies. Videos from the 2017 summit cover a wide range of technologies and innovations which support SDG 6 Clean Water and Sanitation and SDG 11 Sustainable Cities and Communities.
Photos of a beach on Henderson Island in the Pacific Ocean provides yet more evidence of the detrimental impact that packaging and other plastics waste is having on the environment globally. Creating a virtuous circle out of what, until now, has largely been a chain of production from feedstock to consumer will not be easy. But it is the innovation aspect that has fired the imagination of producers, processors and corporate consumers of plastics packaging. This fits with SDG 9.4 to upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes and SDG 7 Affordable and Clean Energy.
Open defecation is a major global health problem. The number of open defecators in India dwarfs that of other states and most live in rural places. Attempts to end rural open defecation by targeting individuals, like social marketing or behaviour change approaches, often ignore the structural inequalities that shape rural residents’ everyday lives. Our study explores the role of remoteness in sustaining open defecation in rural India, advancing knowledge on SDG 6. We deploy the concept of remoteness as an analytical tool that can capture everyday practices of open defecation as a function of physical and social distance.
This study illustrates how consumer social risk footprints can assist in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). For their social footprint, The authors select 4 indicators related to five of the UN's SDGs: gender equality (SDG 5 also 8.5 & 8.8); mother and child health (SDG 3, especially 3.1 & 3.2); governance (SDG 16, especially 16.5 & 16.6); and access to clean water (SDG 6, especially 6.1 & 6.2). The results discussed are important for the UN in developing partnerships to address the SDG's and for organisations such as the World Bank, Trade Unions and NGOs' work towards a fairer world.

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