Elsevier,

Solar Energy Desalination Technology, Chapter 1, 2017, Pages 1–46

To advance goal 6 (clean water and sanitation), this chapter explores different desalination processes to make seawater drinkable, which is an obvious solution to any water shortages. Given the high-polluting energy required in the desalination process, solar-desalination technologies is considered.
An agent-based model is created using data for household characteristics and outdoor water use to calculate water demands. This model represents utility response to water shortages to enact residential restrictions. The agent-based model is coupled with reservoir simulation for a case study, and results are compared to historic data. Sustainability of water policies is evaluated for climate scenarios created using a stochastic reconstruction framework. This is related to SDG 6.
Elsevier,

Climate Risk Management, Volume 16, 2017, Pages 59-72

As the climate continues to change, climate scientists have projected changes in water quantities available for human and other uses. This quantitative study examines how in the US, state water plans and state hazard mitigation plans address climate change. The primary objective of this study is to determine what drives states to plan for the impacts of a changing climate, addressing SDG 13 on climate action.
An international review of stormwater regulation and practices, especially for low-exposure, landscape irrigation schemes in urban environments, was undertaken with a view to identifying what could be used in Alberta, Canada. A general lack of clear guidance and regulation to manage stormwater quality and potential public health risks was identified, which could be hindering the uptake of stormwater schemes generally.This related to SDG6 and SDG 11.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 28, January 2017, Pages 411-419

Urban water management via Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SuDS) has been successfully applied in cities worldwide. The economic feasibility of SuDS in London improves when considering wider benefits. The investment of stakeholder groups is broken down proportional to their benefits. A financial scheme was defined to facilitate SuDS uptake in London based on available incentives and private investment. This is a straightforward methodology that uses available tools and data, to improve SuDS feasibility in planning phases, related to SDG 6.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 28, 2017, Pages 435-449, ISSN 2210-6707,

Cities are strongly dependent on infrastructures providing essential services, namely Lifeline Systems (LS) that support societal functions, safety, economic prosperity and quality of life. The operation of LS in ordinary conditions as well as after disasters is crucial. The main aim of the paper is to define a System Dynamic Model (SDM) to assess the evolution of resilience of a drinking water supply system in case of natural disasters, with particular attention to the role of both ‘structural’ and ‘non-structural’ parameters drawing on the L’Aquila (Italy) earthquake as a case study.
Urban source separation infrastructure systems have a promising potential for a more sustainable management of household food waste and wastewaters. A renewed trend of larger implementations of pilot areas with such systems is currently emerging in Northern Europe. This study investigates the drivers behind the decision of stakeholders to implement source separation systems as well as the importance of the previously existing pilot areas in the decision-making process.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 475-483, ISSN 2210-6707,

Models of university-utility collaboration.
Climate change, rapid urban population growth, land use change, and public concern with rates and use restrictions complicate water management in the cities of the American West. This paper explores a particular collaborative relationship between university researchers and water utilities, providing solutions to barriers that prevent such collaborations. The authors argue that developing an integrated model for university-utility collaborations is a critical area to focus on to achieve sustainable urban water management and advance the water-related SDGs.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 484-496, ISSN 2210-6707

World map of the 142 cities in the UrbMet database.
The sustainability of urban water systems is often compared in small numbers of cases selected as much for their familiarity as for their similarities and differences. Few studies examine large urban datasets to conduct comparisons that identify unexpected similarities and differences among urban water systems and problems. This work supports quantitative comparison of urban water sustainability. Cities were clustered to identify a typology of urban water management profiles. Clustering was based on per capita consumption, population, and annual water budget. This relates to SDG 6, 11 and 12.
This study used social indicators to assess stormwater management. There is a lack of awareness about environmental regulations related to fertilizer use. Social dimensions are crucial in sustainable stormwater management. This addresses SDG 6 and SDG 11.

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