Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society,Volume 27, 2016,Pages 448-456,ISSN 2210-6707

Abstract

Water reuse networks have been emerging globally for the last 50 years.

Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 398-406

Water harvesting is an ancient practice that has been used, mainly in dry environments, to increase efficiency of water collection and use by directing water from a large natural watershed or man-made collection surface into a small basin where the water can be stored in underground reservoirs or to be used directly for irrigation or domestic uses. In modern era water harvesting has been neglected, particularly at the developed countries, due to the technological achievements in the fields of water production and transport. This relates to SDG 6 and SDG 11.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 467-474, ISSN 2210-6707

Water recycling schemes are a viable solution to limitations on water supply and yet public acceptance of these schemes is low. Advancing SDGs 6, 11 and 12, research was conducted in three metropolitan areas in the US to assess basic perceptions of treated wastewater occurrence and its acceptance in the public water supply. De facto reuse occurs at rates across the three cities higher than what is perceived. Roughly 25% of respondents perceive de facto reuse to occur in their home tap water. Respondents who perceived de facto reuse to occur at their tap were ten times more likely to have a high level of acceptance.
London’s ability to remain a world-leading city in an increasingly globalised economy is dependent on it being an efficient, low-risk place to do business and a desirable place to live. This article provides a framework for adaptation planning in urban water supply systems relating to SDG 6 and SDG 11.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 475-483, ISSN 2210-6707,

Models of university-utility collaboration.
Climate change, rapid urban population growth, land use change, and public concern with rates and use restrictions complicate water management in the cities of the American West. This paper explores a particular collaborative relationship between university researchers and water utilities, providing solutions to barriers that prevent such collaborations. The authors argue that developing an integrated model for university-utility collaborations is a critical area to focus on to achieve sustainable urban water management and advance the water-related SDGs.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 484-496, ISSN 2210-6707

World map of the 142 cities in the UrbMet database.
The sustainability of urban water systems is often compared in small numbers of cases selected as much for their familiarity as for their similarities and differences. Few studies examine large urban datasets to conduct comparisons that identify unexpected similarities and differences among urban water systems and problems. This work supports quantitative comparison of urban water sustainability. Cities were clustered to identify a typology of urban water management profiles. Clustering was based on per capita consumption, population, and annual water budget. This relates to SDG 6, 11 and 12.
This study used social indicators to assess stormwater management. There is a lack of awareness about environmental regulations related to fertilizer use. Social dimensions are crucial in sustainable stormwater management. This addresses SDG 6 and SDG 11.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 430-438, ISSN 2210-6707,

Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) infrastructure are conventionally designed based on historical climate data. Yet, variability in rainfall intensities and patterns caused by climate change have a significant impact on the performance of an urban drainage system. Although rainwater harvesting (RWH) is a potential solution to manage stormwater in urban areas, its benefits in mitigating the climate change impacts on combined sewer networks have not been assessed yet. Hence, the goal of the present study was set to evaluate the effectiveness of RWH in alleviating the potential impacts of climate change on CSOs. This relates to SDG 6,11 and 12.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27,2016,Pages 457-466,ISSN 2210-6707,

Broad community support is required to drive progress on SDG 6 and to ensure future water security. This paper explores how social capital, measured by involvement in community organisations, might influence support for alternative water schemes. Research was conducted on a representative sample of Australian adults and highlight the importance of social capital in building engagement in water-related issues.
The detection of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), known as emerging contaminants (ECs), in the environment has attracted growing concern due to their toxicity and potential hazard to the ecosystems and humans. These contaminants are consumed at high quantities worldwide and they are released deliberately or accidentally into the water resources.The conventional treatment technologies that use biological processes cannot effectively remove these contaminants. Therefore, the development of efficient and sustainable removal methods for these emerging contaminants is essential.

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