An agent-based model is created using data for household characteristics and outdoor water use to calculate water demands. This model represents utility response to water shortages to enact residential restrictions. The agent-based model is coupled with reservoir simulation for a case study, and results are compared to historic data. Sustainability of water policies is evaluated for climate scenarios created using a stochastic reconstruction framework. This is related to SDG 6.
An international review of stormwater regulation and practices, especially for low-exposure, landscape irrigation schemes in urban environments, was undertaken with a view to identifying what could be used in Alberta, Canada. A general lack of clear guidance and regulation to manage stormwater quality and potential public health risks was identified, which could be hindering the uptake of stormwater schemes generally.This related to SDG6 and SDG 11.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 28, January 2017, Pages 411-419

Urban water management via Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SuDS) has been successfully applied in cities worldwide. The economic feasibility of SuDS in London improves when considering wider benefits. The investment of stakeholder groups is broken down proportional to their benefits. A financial scheme was defined to facilitate SuDS uptake in London based on available incentives and private investment. This is a straightforward methodology that uses available tools and data, to improve SuDS feasibility in planning phases, related to SDG 6.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 28, 2017, Pages 435-449, ISSN 2210-6707,

Cities are strongly dependent on infrastructures providing essential services, namely Lifeline Systems (LS) that support societal functions, safety, economic prosperity and quality of life. The operation of LS in ordinary conditions as well as after disasters is crucial. The main aim of the paper is to define a System Dynamic Model (SDM) to assess the evolution of resilience of a drinking water supply system in case of natural disasters, with particular attention to the role of both ‘structural’ and ‘non-structural’ parameters drawing on the L’Aquila (Italy) earthquake as a case study.
Urban source separation infrastructure systems have a promising potential for a more sustainable management of household food waste and wastewaters. A renewed trend of larger implementations of pilot areas with such systems is currently emerging in Northern Europe. This study investigates the drivers behind the decision of stakeholders to implement source separation systems as well as the importance of the previously existing pilot areas in the decision-making process.
The detection of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), known as emerging contaminants (ECs), in the environment has attracted growing concern due to their toxicity and potential hazard to the ecosystems and humans. These contaminants are consumed at high quantities worldwide and they are released deliberately or accidentally into the water resources.The conventional treatment technologies that use biological processes cannot effectively remove these contaminants. Therefore, the development of efficient and sustainable removal methods for these emerging contaminants is essential.
This paper uses ‘Medieval’ drought conditions from the 12th Century to simulate the implications of severe and persistent drought for the future of water resource management in metropolitan Phoenix, one of the largest and fastest growing urban areas in the southwestern USA. Anticipatory models enable long-term policy analysis for climate change. Mega-drought results in unsustainable groundwater use between 2000 and 2060. Aggressive drought management policies can produce sustainable yield. The time to manage droughts is before they occur. This relates to SDG 6, SDG 11 and SDG 13.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 398-406

Water harvesting is an ancient practice that has been used, mainly in dry environments, to increase efficiency of water collection and use by directing water from a large natural watershed or man-made collection surface into a small basin where the water can be stored in underground reservoirs or to be used directly for irrigation or domestic uses. In modern era water harvesting has been neglected, particularly at the developed countries, due to the technological achievements in the fields of water production and transport. This relates to SDG 6 and SDG 11.
London’s ability to remain a world-leading city in an increasingly globalised economy is dependent on it being an efficient, low-risk place to do business and a desirable place to live. This article provides a framework for adaptation planning in urban water supply systems relating to SDG 6 and SDG 11.
This study used social indicators to assess stormwater management. There is a lack of awareness about environmental regulations related to fertilizer use. Social dimensions are crucial in sustainable stormwater management. This addresses SDG 6 and SDG 11.

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