Global

Megacities contain at least 10 million people whose wellbeing largely depends on ecosystem services provided by remote natural areas. What is, however, most often disregarded is that nature conservation in the city can also contribute to human wellbeing benefits. The most common mind set separates cities from the rest of nature, as if they were not special kinds of natural habitats.
This book chapter advances SDGs 12 and 15 by explaining how humans have a detrimental impact on natural habitat due to various activities including deforestation, urbanization, roads, the energy sector (renewable and coal), mining, and climate change. The most important form of habitat destruction is deforestation either to develop land for agriculture (70%) or to harvest lumber intensively.
Elsevier,

Journeys of Embodiment at the Intersection of Body and Culture, The Developmental Theory of Embodiment, 2017, Pages 1-42

This chapter advances goals 3 and 5 by examining the description of the Developmental Theory of Embodiment, including two personal examples.
Elsevier,

Journeys of Embodiment at the Intersection of Body and Culture, The Developmental Theory of Embodiment, 2017, Pages 201-256

This chapter advances goals 3 and 5 by examining how the adult women can recapture physical and mental freedom, empowering relationships and membership in equitable communities.
Demise of correspondent banking relationships - SDG Resource Centre
Correspondent banking is the cornerstone of the global payment system, designed to serve the settlement of financial transactions across country borders. It allows companies and individuals to safely move money around the world and supports and encourages global trade. Since the financial crisis, tighter regulations - and in particular the regulatory penalties imposed for violations of anti-money laundering (AML) – have caused western banks to rethink their global strategy. The risks of doing business in many developing nations are beginning to be seen as outweighing the financial benefits brought by correspondent banking activity. As a result, US and European banks have reduced their correspondent banking activity in the riskiest regions.
Elsevier, World Development, Volume 96, 1 August 2017
We adopt a theory-based approach to synthesize research on the effectiveness of payments for environmental services in achieving environmental objectives and socio-economic co-benefits in varying contexts.
Elsevier, Sustainable Energy Technologies and Assessments, Volume 22, August 2017
Access to reliable, affordable and sustainable energy is essential for improving living standards, development and economic growth. From a healthcare perspective, energy is a critical parameter for delivering and improving healthcare services and life-saving interventions in the Global South. This review provides an estimation of the energy needs of different healthcare facilities as a function of patient capacity and services provided. It also presents the strengths and limitations of several energy sources that can be used to meet these needs.
Foreign aid agencies represent and champion global development priorities within a donor nation. Increasingly however, these agencies sit within donor governments that are strongly committed to upholding the national interest through their development commitments. This paper is concerned with how bilateral aid agencies manage this tension and how they might continue to serve the altruistic aims of development.
Strategic human resource management theory suggests that diversity and equality management (DEM) systems provide a firm with a competitive advantage, leading to superior performance. This study proposes and tests a moderated mediation model focusing on antecedents (i.e. top management team gender diversity) and consequences (i.e. performance) of DEM systems in the context of lower through middle management (LTMM) gender diversity. The model was tested in 248 medium-to large-sized organizations using time-lagged survey and archival data.
relx-group-environmental-challenge
The RELX Group Environmental Challenge, with a $50,000 prize for the first place entry and a $25,000 prize for the second place entry, is awarded to projects that provide sustainable access to safe water where it is presently at risk and/or access to improved sanitation. This directly assists SDG 6.1 and 6.2 to achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water and access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene, for all. Find out more about the 2017 winners.

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