Biodiversity and ecosystems

Biodiversity and ecosystems, encompassing the vast variety of life on Earth and the natural systems they inhabit, are fundamental to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Their importance is acknowledged explicitly in several SDGs due to their critical role in maintaining environmental balance and supporting human life and well-being.

SDG 14 (Life Below Water) and SDG 15 (Life on Land) are directly focused on the conservation and sustainable use of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, respectively. These goals recognize the intrinsic value of biodiversity and the vital services ecosystems provide, such as habitat for wildlife, carbon sequestration, and soil formation. The preservation and restoration of ecosystems like forests, wetlands, and coral reefs are essential for maintaining biodiversity, which in turn supports ecological resilience and the sustenance of human life.

The role of biodiversity and ecosystems in achieving SDG 2 (Zero Hunger) is significant. The variety of life forms, including plants, animals, and microorganisms, underpins agricultural productivity. Pollinators, soil organisms, and genetic diversity of crops are all crucial for food production and agricultural resilience. Ecosystems support agriculture not just in terms of crop yield but also in sustaining the natural resources like soil and water, upon which agriculture depends.

Similarly, SDG 6 (Clean Water and Sanitation) is closely tied to the health of ecosystems. Natural habitats such as forests and wetlands play a key role in filtering and purifying water, maintaining the water cycle, and regulating water flow. This natural filtration process is vital for providing clean drinking water and supporting sanitation systems.

Biodiversity and ecosystems are also crucial for SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-being). Natural environments regulate diseases by supporting a balance among species that, in turn, can control pest and disease outbreaks. Additionally, a vast number of medical discoveries, including medicines and treatments, have their origins in biological resources, underscoring the potential of biodiversity in contributing to human health and well-being.

Moreover, biodiversity and ecosystems play a significant role in addressing climate change, linking to SDG 13 (Climate Action). Ecosystems such as forests and oceans are major carbon sinks, absorbing and storing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Protecting and restoring these ecosystems are vital strategies for climate change mitigation. Additionally, healthy ecosystems provide crucial services for climate change adaptation, such as protecting against extreme weather events and helping communities adjust to changing environmental conditions.

However, achieving these goals requires addressing threats to biodiversity and ecosystems, such as habitat destruction, pollution, overfishing, and invasive species. It also involves balancing the needs of human development with environmental conservation, ensuring sustainable use of natural resources.

Biodiversity and ecosystems are integral to achieving multiple SDGs. Their conservation and sustainable use not only benefit the environment but are essential for food security, water purity, human health, and combating climate change. The protection and restoration of biodiversity and ecosystems are therefore crucial steps towards sustainable development and ensuring the well-being of current and future generations.

The study was conducted with the aim of investigating population diversification and characterization morphologically which helps to fill the gap of molecular characterization on the population of donkey.
The study shows the investigation concludes that the Nanowarming of cryopreserved ovarian tissue has the potential to protect the tissue from cryoinjury in sheep.
Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in Southeast Alaska have been studied for over 50 years, and are largely considered a recovery success since the cessation of commercial whaling. To further sustain this success we need to improve our knowledge of how these giants reproduce. The authors developed an effective strategy for monitoring the hormone levels in a challenging natural environment.
This Health Policy paper supports SDGs 3, 15, and 17, among others, by exploring the potential values and risks of establishing an Intergovernmental Panel for One Health (IPOH), with the aim of contributing to addressing other global challenges, such as food and water safety and environmental degradation in the context of One Health.
Elsevier,

Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Volume 38, August 2023

This work highlights what we know about climate change impacts that have happened and discuss future directions for research. It supports SDG 13 and 14.
This Health Policy paper supports SDGs 2, 3, and 13, by identifying and examining the debates that arose from the publication of the EAT–Lancet Commission, systematically examining how research has been directly influenced by the Commission, and synthesising identified research gaps to build a research agenda for healthy and sustainable food systems.

RELX SDG Inspiration Day 2023: Fostering Global Cooperation to Advance Biodiversity

The event saw spirited discussions on how leaders, businesses, organisations, and people can help protect nature and biodiversity.

Over 1500 people gathered virtually on 13 June 2023 for the ninth RELX SDG Inspiration Day: "Not Too Late for Nature: Biodiversity and the UN Sustainable Development Goals."

Find all the details and watch the videos from the 2023 RELX SDG Inspiration Day: "Not Too Late for Nature: Biodiversity and the UN Sustainable Development Goals." Eminent conservationist Dr. Jane Goodall, DBE, Founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and UN Messenger of Peace and 8th United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, provided keynote remarks alongside many more global leaders and subject matter experts.
Solar panels in a field
Recognising our customers' exceptional work to achieve the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals
This study supports SDG 14 by uncovering how biotas responded to global change during the early Paleocene greenhouse mode.

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