Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society,Volume 27,2016,Pages 419-429,ISSN 2210-6707

Shortages of freshwater have become a serious issue in many regions around the world, partly due to rapid urbanisation and climate change. Sustainable city development should consider minimising water use by those people living in cities and urban areas. The purpose of this paper is to improve our understanding of water-use behaviour and to reliably predict water use, highly relevant to SDG 6 and 11.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society,Volume 27,2016,Pages 439-447,ISSN 2210-6707

The study of resilience in the face of large physical and climatic change has emerged as an important area of research. But while the physical variables under study are easily identified, the notion of resilience itself remains nebulous. This poses a special challenge to water security in cities. The tensions are resolved when resilience is conceived of as a teleological concept that relates to the desired futures of the community.This study shows an empirical way to achieve this by using narrative analysis on the case of water security. Such a teleological concept can be used to resolve tensions pointed out earlier and give practical insights, related to SDG 6 and 11.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 467-474, ISSN 2210-6707

Water recycling schemes are a viable solution to limitations on water supply and yet public acceptance of these schemes is low. Advancing SDGs 6, 11 and 12, research was conducted in three metropolitan areas in the US to assess basic perceptions of treated wastewater occurrence and its acceptance in the public water supply. De facto reuse occurs at rates across the three cities higher than what is perceived. Roughly 25% of respondents perceive de facto reuse to occur in their home tap water. Respondents who perceived de facto reuse to occur at their tap were ten times more likely to have a high level of acceptance.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society,Volume 27, 2016,Pages 448-456,ISSN 2210-6707

Water reuse networks have been emerging globally for the last 50 years. This article furthers SDGS 6 and 11 by reviewing the economic, social and environmental issues related to implementing water reuse networks in cities, with a focus on London, UK.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 475-483, ISSN 2210-6707,

Models of university-utility collaboration.
Climate change, rapid urban population growth, land use change, and public concern with rates and use restrictions complicate water management in the cities of the American West. This paper explores a particular collaborative relationship between university researchers and water utilities, providing solutions to barriers that prevent such collaborations. The authors argue that developing an integrated model for university-utility collaborations is a critical area to focus on to achieve sustainable urban water management and advance the water-related SDGs.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 430-438, ISSN 2210-6707,

Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) infrastructure are conventionally designed based on historical climate data. Yet, variability in rainfall intensities and patterns caused by climate change have a significant impact on the performance of an urban drainage system. Although rainwater harvesting (RWH) is a potential solution to manage stormwater in urban areas, its benefits in mitigating the climate change impacts on combined sewer networks have not been assessed yet. Hence, the goal of the present study was set to evaluate the effectiveness of RWH in alleviating the potential impacts of climate change on CSOs. This relates to SDG 6,11 and 12.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27,2016,Pages 457-466,ISSN 2210-6707,

Broad community support is required to drive progress on SDG 6 and to ensure future water security. This paper explores how social capital, measured by involvement in community organisations, might influence support for alternative water schemes. Research was conducted on a representative sample of Australian adults and highlight the importance of social capital in building engagement in water-related issues.
Elsevier,

Futures, Available online 19 October 2016

Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) is vital for advancing the SDGs. This paper looks at transformative learning that prepares students for societal change. The discussion is grounded both in theories about hope from disparate scientific disciplines and in empirical research about young people’s hope concerning global climate change. These insights particularly inform SDG 4.7 to ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, as well as SDGs 3, 11 and 13.
Reed Exhibitions,

 World Travel Market, 27 September 2016

Tourists walking through Barcelona
Overtourism' is likely to become a commonplace term over the next few years as the travel industry grapples with sustainable tourism. Addressing the issues faced will help to advance SDG 8.9 to devise and implement policies to promote sustainable tourism that create jobs and promote local culture and products as well as SDG 11.4 to strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage.
In the US, land owners are liable for environmental impacts in relation to contaminated land. This Lexis Practice Advisor practice note explains what due diligence should be carried out in relation to the purchase of land/buildings to assess the environmental risk. Environmental due diligence advances SDG 3.9 to substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination, and generally supports SDG 11 Sustainable cities and SDG 15 Life on land.

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