Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

Hydrolysers on the Barron's JCB telehandler and New Holland TS115 tractor
Scottish farmers have been using clean energy technology normally used by buses and bin lorries to power their farm machines, helping to reduce emissions and make efficiencies. This helps to advance both goal 7 and goal 12.
With increasing pressure on chemical solutions to pests and diseases from the public, and growing resistance from plants as well as the risk to bees and other beneficial insects, farmers urgently need viable alternatives. Farmers Weekly talked to a UK farmer who is relying on biological controls to keep his oilseed rape healthy and yields profitable. This helps support SDG 12 - responsible consumption and production.
A drone's eye view of a root crop planter, pulled by a tractor as it works in the field
This article explores how innovations can be used to advance goals 2 (zero hunger) and 12 (sustainable consumption and production). Nematicides - products for controlling soil-borne pests in root crops - are under threat of further regulation or withdrawal due to their toxicity. The Nematicide Stewardship Programme is demonstrating they can be used responsibly and safely to ensure their approval is maintained. But one farmer has taken it a step further by using technology to ensure his nematicide is applied accurately.
Reed Exhibitions,

World Travel Market, Responsible Tourism Blog, June 2017

june-sdg-session-2016-hotels-sdgs-and-transparent-reporting
At the heart of Responsible Tourism are commitments to transparency and accountability. It is a process of addressing the sustainability issues which arise in a particular place and which the business can do something about, materiality matters. But it is not enough to focus only on the process, it is important to report the achievement. This blog explores reporting frameworks, rating initiatives, certification, recognition and showcases best practice.
Many countries are experiencing economic benefit from a surge in tourism, but once pristine landscapes are changing and local communities rarely benefit from the tourism, and instead run the risk of losing their livelihoods. Researchers in Thailand are investigating “creative tourism” – creative, sustainable approaches to tourism, that enable producers and consumers to relate and get value from their connections. This supports the tourism elements of SDGs 8, 12 and 14.
Reed Exhibitions,

World Travel Market, Responsible Tourism Blog, May 2017

Ecotourism wildlife conservation and sdgs
The marketing value of the concept of ecotourism is now very low, as there is very little evidence that it delivers. Many people in the developing world are unable to visit National Parks and suffer only negative impacts – loss of access for meat, fruits, thatching grass and land for agriculture. How does a consumer or tour operator identify wildlife operators and conservancies that are really making a contribution? Either to wildlife and habitat conservation or to the livelihoods of local communities to ensure that they benefit from conservation?
Field trial visit to the Center of Excellence for Rice in Malaysia, left to right: Shahrizal Abdul, Rob van Daalen, Raudhah Talib, Dr. Suzana Yusup, Noor Hafizah Ramli and Abu Bakar Ahmad.
The winner of the first ever Green and Sustainable Chemistry Challenge, Dr Suzana Yusup, invited Rob van Daalen (publisher Chemistry and initiator of the Challenge) to make a site visit to see the progress of her project "Biopesticide for Improvement of Paddy Yield". The visit made clear that the Elsevier sustainability program and specifically this challenge have a positive impact on health, environment and society in local communities in Malaysia, enhancing efforts to advance SDGs 1, 6, 12 and 15.
The 2017 Responsible Tourism Awards, presented during World Responsible Tourism Day, are focused on the SDGs. The first three categories are looking for specific contributions to SDG 8, SDG 12, SDG 3 whilst the remaining two categories are open to businesses and other tourism organisations supporting the remaining 14 SDGs. Entries close on 31 August 2017.