Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Green and Sustainable Chemistry, Volume 4, April 2017, Pages 1-7, ISSN 2452-2236,

The need for better conversion technologies is a driving force behind many recent developments in materials. Second generation solar cells are based on thin films of materials, as compound semiconductor absorber layers. The thin film technology has a high potential, but research is needed to raise the device efficiency to such levels that cost of delivered power can be reduced. The paper by Siebenttritt recent developments which made thin film solar cells based on the chalcopyrite-type compounds Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 [(CIGS) or (CIS)], promising materials which could significantly contribute as thin-film materials to the future share of photovoltaics in the supply of electrical power.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Green and Sustainable Chemistry, Volume 4, April 2017, Pages 72-76, ISSN 2452-2236

Hybrid perovskites are key to any discussion of materials for solar energy conversion. These organic-inorganic semiconductors (e. g. methyl ammonium lead iodide), which adopt the perovskite crystal structure, have perturbed the landscape of photovoltaic research. Highly efficient solar cells based on hybrid perovskite absorber layers can be fabricated by solution processed active layers. These materials are abundant and the simple processing could make high-throughput and low cost manufacturing at large scale possible. Exploring the materials that are viable in solar energy conversion contributes to advancing SDG 7.
Elsevier,

Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 70, April 2017, Pages 161-184

This journal article addresses goals 7, 13, 14 and 15 by discussing the impacts of different renewable energy pathways on ecosystems and biodiversity, and the implications of these impacts for transitioning to a Green Economy.
Elsevier,

Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 69, March 2017, Pages 596-609

Multiple criteria decision making (MCDM) is a branch of operational research dealing with finding optimal results in complex scenarios including various indicators, conflicting objectives and criteria. This tool is becoming popular in the field of energy planning due to the flexibility it provides to the decision makers to take decisions while considering all the criteria and objectives simultaneously. This paper relates to SDG 7-clean and affordable energy.
Shakespeare’s allegory can be employed to articulate sustainable strategies in many of the SDG themes. For example, SDG 3 (Good health and well-being); SDG 7 (Affordable and clean energy); SDG 8 (Decent Work and economic growth); SDG 13 (Climate Action) and SDG 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions). This article examines how Shakespeare's works anticipate sustainability narratives for society at large and its individual actors.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Computing: Informatics and Systems, Volume 13, March 2017, Pages 15-30.

Given the urgent demand for sustainable development in the modern manufacturing industry, this paper proposes a new low-carbon mathematical scheduling model that considers productivity, energy efficiency and noise reduction for the flexible job shop environment. This contributes to SDGs 7 and 9.
Elsevier,

Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 67, January 2017, Pages 1420-1435

This article argues that an integrated electricity market in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) would enable an efficient use of the regions vast clean energy resources, in support of SDG 7. Ppossible techniques that help expedite the renewable power generations to overcome the limitations associated with the establishment of the ASEAN power grid (APG) are explored, as well as future research direction in enhancing the utilization of APG for ASEAN.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Chemical Engineering, Volume 17, Pages 22-34, August 2017

This paper deals with carbon capture and storage. It provides an overview of the different technologies that have been trialled and the technological gaps that need to be bridged to make this a viable option in the long term and therefore working towards SDG 7 (affordable and clean energy) and SDG 13 (climate action).
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 28, 2017, Pages 450-452

Contributing to SDGs 6, 7 and 13, this paper discusses the CO2 footprint of California’s drought during 2012–2014. The authors show that California drought significantly increased CO2 emissions of the energy sector by around 22 million metric tons, indicating 33% increase in the annual CO2 emissions compared to pre-drought conditions. They argue that CO2 emission of climate extremes deserve more attention, because their cumulative impacts on CO2 emissions are staggering. Most countries, including the United States, do not have a comprehensive a nationwide energy-water plan to minimize their CO2 emissions, therefore the authors argue that developing a national water-energy plan under a changing climate should be prioritized in the coming years.
In a world where the demand for energy continues to rise and fossil-fuel reserves become more depleted each day, we desperately need new clean energy resources to keep pace with the demand. Renewable energy generated via wind, solar, geothermal, and tidal power will help to reduce our CO2 emissions by 80% of 1990 levels by 2050, but implementing these resources is challenging. In this Catalysis piece, Kaltsoyannis and Liddle explore the role that nuclear power will play in the future. In particular, they discuss the major problems associated with nuclear power and how chemists and fundamental chemical research can take a lead role in providing solutions to make it clean and support SDG 7. This catalyst article generates two reaction responses from Dame Sue Ion and Dr. Robin Taylor.

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