World Future Energy Summit is the world’s leading business event for future energy and sustainability, showcasing pioneering technologies and ground-breaking thinking in energy, energy efficiency, water, solar, waste, smart cities, climate and the environment. As a global hub for business, innovation and knowledge exchange, World Future Energy Summit inspires the advancement and transfer of ideas, technology and investment across borders and between the public and private sectors worldwide, helping stimulate sustainable growth for all.
World Efficiency Solutions (WES) is the premier international meeting for the low-carbon and resource-efficient economy focussed on creating the low-carbon and resource-efficient market place. WES was first held in 2015 in Paris during COP21 negotiations, focusing on climate change solutions. World Efficiency develops a new environment consensus: economic and human activities must, to be sustainable, be redesigned to limit their impact on the environment while awareness of the planetary limits (climate change and resources scarcity) becomes widespread. A key objective for WES 2017 is to Identify new market opportunities aligned to the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (estimated market opportunities are larger than USD 12 trillion) and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change from 2015.
Stop corruption
Substantially reducing corruption and bribery in all forms is a target of goal 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions). This blog reviews the rise of anti-foreign bribery legislation in the 20 years since the OECD's Anti-Bribery Convention was signed by 43 states and countries.
Anti Slavery Day
Modern slavery risks have risen across the world over the last year, including in 20 of the 28 member states of the EU. On Anti-Slavery Day, this blog looks at the increased risks and numbers of victims of forced labour in supply chains, and how to mitigate these risks contributing to goal 8 (decent work and economic growth).
Demise of correspondent banking relationships - SDG Resource Centre
Correspondent banking is the cornerstone of the global payment system, designed to serve the settlement of financial transactions across country borders. It allows companies and individuals to safely move money around the world and supports and encourages global trade. Since the financial crisis, tighter regulations - and in particular the regulatory penalties imposed for violations of anti-money laundering (AML) – have caused western banks to rethink their global strategy. The risks of doing business in many developing nations are beginning to be seen as outweighing the financial benefits brought by correspondent banking activity. As a result, US and European banks have reduced their correspondent banking activity in the riskiest regions.
SDG Business Forum
In July the 2017 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) Business Forum recognised the critical role of business in delivering on the promise of sustainable and inclusive development. In this article, we elaborate on the SDG business case, and how businesses can engage with the SDG framework; driving business growth and productivity, whilst contributing to the better world envisaged by the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
The Consolidated Versions of the Treaty on European Union and the Treaty on the Functioning of the Eu-ropean Union (the EU Treaties) set out the constitutional framework for the EU. The Treaties do not attempt to define sustainable development or impose an EU-wide adoption of a common definition. This practice note sets out the approach to sustainable development at the EU institutional level. This has an impact on all SDGs but in particular, SDGs 9, 10 and 13.
UK mechanisms touching on sustainable development are generally based on, and have as their over-arching objective, some variation of the so-called “Brundtland definition”. These mechanisms also widely reference the three interconnected ‘pillars’ of sustainable development, also known as the ‘triple bottom line’ of sustainable development. The UK approach has a bearing on all SDGs and in particular, SDGs 9, 10 and 13.
This overview provides guidance on the concepts of sustainability and corporate responsibility as understood under UK law, including the institutional framework for sustainable development. This guidance is relevant to all SDGs and in particular to SDGs 9, 11, and 12.
Reed Exhibitions,

World Travel Market, Responsible Tourism Blog, June 2017

june-sdg-session-2016-hotels-sdgs-and-transparent-reporting
At the heart of Responsible Tourism are commitments to transparency and accountability. It is a process of addressing the sustainability issues which arise in a particular place and which the business can do something about, materiality matters. But it is not enough to focus only on the process, it is important to report the achievement. This blog explores reporting frameworks, rating initiatives, certification, recognition and showcases best practice.

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