Disaster risk reduction

River dredging in progress
Water management - and ensuring an adequate supply for everyone - is one of the biggest challenges being faced by the UK. In a move by the Environment Agency, internal drainage boards could be given a bigger role in making that happen, helping to reducing flood risks to farmland and local villages in the process. This helps meet SDG 6, Clean Water and Sanitation.
A Global Outlook on Disaster Report 2017
Despite loss of life and economic devastation worldwide due to increasingly frequent natural and man-made disasters, scientific research on disasters represents a small percentage of scholarly output. Furthermore, countries with the highest death tolls from disasters tend to be low-income countries and have low-levels of scholarly output overall and in disaster science; countries with higher research output overall, as well as in disaster science, tend to be high-income countries and sustain the greatest economic losses from disasters. This report advances SDG 11 target 5, which is specifically concerned with disaster risk reduction.
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Disaster risk reduction is embedded in target 5 for SDG 11 sustainable cities and communities. Recognising that Asia-Pacific is the most disaster-prone region in the world and the devastating impact natural disasters have on people, communities and economies, Elsevier is working with partners to advance understanding of natural disaster science and encourage collaboration between researchers and disciplines.

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 28, 2017, Pages 435-449, ISSN 2210-6707,

Cities are strongly dependent on infrastructures providing essential services, namely Lifeline Systems (LS) that support societal functions, safety, economic prosperity and quality of life. The operation of LS in ordinary conditions as well as after disasters is crucial. The main aim of the paper is to define a System Dynamic Model (SDM) to assess the evolution of resilience of a drinking water supply system in case of natural disasters, with particular attention to the role of both ‘structural’ and ‘non-structural’ parameters drawing on the L’Aquila (Italy) earthquake as a case study.
The role of agriculture in flood risk mitigation has been largely overlooked in the UK government’s national flood resilience review. Farm leaders are concerned that the review contains little mention of agriculture, rural communities or food security. This highlights the need to address flood risk mitigation holistically to support SDG 13.1 to strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters, and SDG 2.4 to implement resilient agricultural practices that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, including flooding.