Disaster risk reduction

Advancing SDG 3 (good health and well being) and SDG 8 (decent work and economic growth), this XpertHR blog post discusses the measures employers can take to better prepare for the risk of an active shooter event in the workplace.
Elsevier, Progress in Disaster Science, Volume 2, July 2019
The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction encourages investment in innovation and technology development in disaster risk management. However, needs for science and technology inputs are unmet, and there is a lack of policy making that is based on science and evidence. This paper identified three key issues that could help overcome these barriers: networking, coproduction of knowledge, and a stronger role played by academia.
This chapter addresses SDGs 3 and 10 by exploring the process of Disability-inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction (DiDRR) from two Deaf Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) practitioners working in partnership with an international team.
Elsevier,

Evaluating Water Quality to Prevent Future Disasters, 2019, Pages 1-12

Water-quality disasters occur frequently worldwide. They do not necessarily occur only in underdeveloped world. Detailed water-quality evaluations can help prevent occurrence of some of these disasters. Contributing to SDGs 10 and 11, this chapter discusses our vulnerability to water disasters to help us avoid some of them in the future.
This book chapter advances SDGs 6, 10 and 11 by discussing our vulnerability to water disasters to help us avoid some of them in the future.
The “build back better” (BBB) approach to disaster recovery was first introduced in 2006 by the United Nations Secretary-General's Special Envoy for Tsunami Recovery, former US President William Clinton. In 2015, BBB became the second half of Priority 4 of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030, in recognition of its widespread use and adoption among disaster risk management practitioners, policy-makers, and researchers.
This viewpoint reviews key assessments from the IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 °C and examines the implications for the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (SFDRR). Disaster risks are expected to be higher at 1.5 °C and continue to increase at 2 °C. Current and future disaster risk management particularly those that deal with the impacts of coastal flooding, heat-related health impacts, sea level rise, and forest fires are to be strengthened, particularly the Arctic, Caribbean, SIDS and low-lying coastal areas are particularly at risk.
The UN has adopted the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015–2030; SFDRR) in March 2015 and the member countries agreed to shift from disaster management to disaster risk management. The SFDRR is in line with the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs; September 2015). In 2016, the UNISDR together with partner organizations has prepared roadmap for mainstreaming Science and Technology in SFDRR. Out of four priority areas, this paper focuses on the appraisal of challenges in SFDRR priority 1 “understanding disaster risk” through the lens of science, technology and innovations.

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