Food security and nutrition and sustainable agriculture

Food security, nutrition, and sustainable agriculture constitute fundamental elements that contribute significantly to the attainment of the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). These goals are a globally shared blueprint that calls for peace and prosperity for all people and the planet. Focusing on food security and nutrition is directly linked to SDG 2 which seeks to "End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture." Beyond SDG 2, these themes also relate to other SDGs such as Goal 3 - Good Health and Well-being, Goal 12 - Responsible Consumption and Production, and Goal 13 - Climate Action. The relationship between sustainable agriculture and these goals is profound; by promoting eco-friendly farming methods, we reduce the environmental footprint, mitigate climate change, and ensure the long-term sustainability of food production systems.

Moreover, sustainable agriculture is vital in fostering biodiversity, improving soil health, and enhancing water use efficiency, which are critical aspects related to Goals 14 and 15 - Life below Water and Life on Land respectively. By safeguarding our ecosystems, we not only ensure food security but also the preservation of the natural environment for future generations. In turn, better nutrition is a conduit to improved health (SDG 3), and it can also influence educational outcomes (SDG 4), given the known links between nutrition and cognitive development.

Furthermore, it is worth noting that the interconnections go beyond these goals. There's an important nexus between sustainable agriculture, food security and issues of poverty (SDG 1), gender equality (SDG 5), clean water and sanitation (SDG 6), and economic growth (SDG 8), among others. Sustainable agriculture creates job opportunities, thus reducing poverty levels. By empowering women in agriculture, we can help achieve gender equality. Proper water and sanitation practices in agriculture can prevent contamination, ensuring clean water and sanitation for all. Therefore, the triad of food security, nutrition, and sustainable agriculture, while being a significant goal in itself, is also a vehicle that drives the achievement of the wider Sustainable Development Goals.

Elsevier,

Global Perspectives on Childhood Obesity (Second Edition), Current Status, Consequences and Prevention, 2019, Pages 351-361

Describes psychological techniques that may offer an effective approach to preventing severe obesity from developing during puberty. Supports SGD goal: 2.2.2 Prevalence of malnutrition
Furthering SDGs 2 and 12, this report argues that feeding a population of 10 billion people by 2050 with a healthy and sustainable diet will be impossible without transforming eating habits, improving food production and reducing food waste.
Elsevier,

Encyclopedia of Environmental Health, Volume , 1 January 2019

This chapter aligns with Goal 6, 3 and 11 by describing the leading methods for treating and maintaining the microbiological quality of drinking water at the household level. It reviews the challenges of optimizing uptake of effective household water treatment among vulnerable populations in low-income countries and potential risks associated with climate change.
Brassica carinata (Ethiopian mustard) could be a potential oilseed species for the semiarid tropics but no work has been done to explore the agronomic potential of the crop. Besides that, there is very little chance for horizontal growth of the crop as land is shrinking due to population growth in South-East Asia. Thus, the traditional practice of mixed cropping has gained popularity in recent years in the form of intercropping with a suitable modification in planting pattern.
The world food price crisis in 2007/08 has aroused worldwide attention to the global food price volatility and food self-sufficiency issues. This paper modelled the entire environment of food production and transaction from a holistic view by a Food-Energy-Water (FEW) nexus in order to reveal the hidden connections related to the food self-sufficiency issue, including the interdependencies of food production with its restraining factors (hybrid energy, hybrid water), other production sectors, and international exchanges.
Elsevier,

Saving Food: Production, Supply Chain, Food Waste and Food Consumption, Volume , 1 January 2019

Food waste is a great problem nowadays; while many people are starving around the world, tons of food is wasted every day. An efficient way to preserve food is using industrial processes such as heat, cold, drying, fermentation, irradiation, high pressure, pulsed electric fields and modified atmosphere, among others, but it is also possible to use active packaging (AP) to extend the shelf life of food products. This packaging uses active compounds, as antimicrobial and antioxidants that could be released over time in the food and its products and increase their shelf life.

Elsevier,

Science of the Total Environment, Volume 648, 15 January 2019

One of the key Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) set by the United Nations (UN) aims by 2030 to “end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture”. Fertilizers will play a pivotal role in achieving that goal given that ~90% of crop production growth is expected to come from higher yields and increased cropping intensity. However, materials-science research on fertilizers has received little attention, especially in Africa.

Elsevier,

The Autoimmune Diseases (Sixth Edition), 2020, Pages 331-342

Highlights the profound effects of diet and bacterial metabolites on disease in humans.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Food Supply Chains: Planning, Design, and Control through Interdisciplinary Methodologies, 2019, Pages 249-260

This book chapter addresses goals 2 and 12 by analysing food systems sustainability through the lens of the interrelated implications and impacts of FLW on production and consumption.
Elsevier,

Current Directions in Water Scarcity Research, Volume 2, 2019, Pages 195-210

This book chapter addresses goals 1, 8 and 15 by focusing on rainfall index, which links insurance payouts to historical rainfall data from reliable weather gauging stations, and how it relates to crop and livestock losses. The system works in such a way that if the data shows that the rainfall amount is below the threshold, the insurance pays out. If implemented effectively, it has the potential to revolutionise access to formal insurance by smallholders.

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