Gender equality and women's empowerment

Elsevier, The Lancet, Volume 393, 9 - 15 February 2019
Background: Clinical and preclinical studies have shown that there are sex-based differences at the genetic, cellular, biochemical, and physiological levels. Despite this, numerous studies have shown poor levels of inclusion of female populations into medical research. These disparities in sex inclusion in research are further complicated by the absence of sufficient reporting and analysis by sex of study populations. Disparities in the inclusion of the sexes in medical research substantially reduce the utility of the results of such research for the entire population.
Elsevier, The Lancet, Volume 393, 9 - 15 February 2019
Elsevier, The Lancet, Volume 393, 9 - 15 February 2019
Elsevier,

The Lancet, Volume 393, Number 10171, 9 February 2019, pages 493-610. 

This special issue from The Lancet focusses on SDG 5 (gender equality) within science, medicine, and global health, contributing to SDG 3 (good health and wellbeing).  This issue also contributes to SDG 8 (decent work and economic growth) and SDG 10 (reduced inequalities).

Elsevier,

The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10171, 9–15 February 2019, Pages 512-514.

Directly contributing to SDG 10 (reduced inequalities), SDG 5 (gender equality) and SDG 4 (quality education), this report investigates sexual harassment incidents within academia and discusses the uprising of online naming and shaming of sexual harassment culprits.
Image of Marcia Balisciano
During the World Economic Forum in Davos, Márcia Balisciano, Corporate Responsibility Director at RELX Group, spoke about how women are advancing the 17 SDGs in a panel empowering women to advance the goals.
This podcast highlights how the #MeToo campaign is tackling sexual harassment in the workplace and helping to empower women. It is advancing SDG 5, gender equality.
Elsevier, World Development, Volume 113, January 2019
SDG 8 calls for promoting 'sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all’. Even as it highlights the importance of labour rights for all, it also makes visible some significant tensions. We note, for example, that despite many critiques of narrow economic measures of growth, the focus here remains on GDP and per capita growth. This is problematic, we argue, because the GDP productive boundary excludes much of social reproductive work.

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